#4707 – 2012 First-Class Forever Stamp - Flag and "Liberty'" (Ashton Potter)

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U.S. #4707
2012 45¢ Liberty
Four Flags
 
Issue Date: September 14, 2012
City:
Washington, DC
Quantity: 85,500,000
Printed By: Ashton Potter
Printing Method: Offset
Perforations: Die Cut 11 ¼ X 10 ¾
Color: Multicolored
 
On a quiet Sunday morning, a flag fluttered in the December breeze over the Capitol in Washington, D.C. That flag would become significant because of events happening halfway around the world. It was December 7, 1941, the day Japan attacked the naval base in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 
 
Traditionally, the flag above the U.S. Capitol is changed every day. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt gave orders that the same flag remain until Congress made a formal Declaration of War against Japan the next day, followed by Germany and Italy on December 11. 
 
Roosevelt called it the “Flag of Liberation,” and the banner was carefully preserved. The flag traveled with the President to French Morocco, in 1943, when he met with Britain’s Prime Minister Winston Churchill at the Casablanca Conference. There, the leaders of the two countries decided to join forces to defeat the Axis powers of Germany, Italy, and Japan.
 
After the death of Roosevelt, Harry Truman became President and was given the Flag of Liberation. Realizing its significance, the President stood at attention as that flag was raised over the former Nazi capital of Berlin, Germany, on July 20, 1945. Truman said the flag represented the American people, “who are looking forward to a better world...”

 

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U.S. #4707
2012 45¢ Liberty
Four Flags
 
Issue Date: September 14, 2012
City:
Washington, DC
Quantity: 85,500,000
Printed By: Ashton Potter
Printing Method: Offset
Perforations: Die Cut 11 ¼ X 10 ¾
Color: Multicolored
 
On a quiet Sunday morning, a flag fluttered in the December breeze over the Capitol in Washington, D.C. That flag would become significant because of events happening halfway around the world. It was December 7, 1941, the day Japan attacked the naval base in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 
 
Traditionally, the flag above the U.S. Capitol is changed every day. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt gave orders that the same flag remain until Congress made a formal Declaration of War against Japan the next day, followed by Germany and Italy on December 11. 
 
Roosevelt called it the “Flag of Liberation,” and the banner was carefully preserved. The flag traveled with the President to French Morocco, in 1943, when he met with Britain’s Prime Minister Winston Churchill at the Casablanca Conference. There, the leaders of the two countries decided to join forces to defeat the Axis powers of Germany, Italy, and Japan.
 
After the death of Roosevelt, Harry Truman became President and was given the Flag of Liberation. Realizing its significance, the President stood at attention as that flag was raised over the former Nazi capital of Berlin, Germany, on July 20, 1945. Truman said the flag represented the American people, “who are looking forward to a better world...”