#4723 – 2013 46c Kaleidoscope Flowers: Green and Purple

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$2.00
$2.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.40
$0.40
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM639215x35mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM77032x34mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.95
$3.95

U.S. # 4723
2013 46¢ Yellow-Green
Kaleidoscope Flowers

A popular children’s toy today, the kaleidoscope began as a tool for artists and was widely enjoyed by adults as a leisure activity.  In the early 1800s, scientists began experimenting with light and optics. “Philosophical toys” appeared, both entertaining and sharing scientific advances.
 
One of these new philosophical toys was the kaleidoscope, invented by Scotsman Dr. David Brewster in 1816. The name comes from the Greek words kalos eidos scopos, which means “beautiful form watcher.” The arrangement of mirrors and brightly colored objects in a tube created limitless beautiful patterns that Brewster thought could serve as inspiration for designers and artists.
 
American Charles Bush vastly improved on the kaleidoscope in 1873, patenting new features including a stand and rotating wheel to increase the number of designs. He also introduced the use of ampules, small glass vials filled with liquids of different densities, which allowed for more intricate designs.
 
The kaleidoscope lost popularity among adults as new technologies emerged. However, a 1985 exhibit of over 100 kaleidoscopes brought renewed interest. The Brewster Kaleidoscope Society was soon formed, bringing together both collectors and artists, and encouraging new advancements in kaleidoscope design.

Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the Kaleidoscope Flower stamps using the art of graphic artists Petra and Nicole Kapitza. Each stamp pictures the same flower shape with different colors, creating the illusion that the patterns recede or move forward.

Value: 46¢ first class letter rate
Issued:  January 14, 2013
First Day City:  Kansas City, MO
Type of Stamp: Definitive
Printed by: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products
Method: Offset printing in coils of 3,000 and 10,000
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 11
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 42,500,000 stamps

The Kaleidoscope Flower stamps continue the U.S.P.S. tradition of picturing beautiful flowers on postage.  These stamps were issued in large coils for use by businesses that send large amounts of first-class letters.

Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty 2021 First Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty

    In 2021, the United States Postal Service anticipated the arrival of spring with a new set of 10 Forever stamps honoring Garden Beauty.  Order yours today!

    $10.95- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels  May Include Targets, Stars, Numbers, or Grids. Set of 5 with small imperfections Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels
    Since they first appeared in the 19th century, fancy cancels have been extremely sought-after by collectors.  Act now to add five of these to your collection.  Stamps may vary, but that's half the fun!
    $12.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the American flag, Alexander Hamilton, Religious Freedom, Overland Mail, NATO, and more.  This money saving offer saves you over $90!  Order your set today.
    $89.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. # 4723
2013 46¢ Yellow-Green
Kaleidoscope Flowers

A popular children’s toy today, the kaleidoscope began as a tool for artists and was widely enjoyed by adults as a leisure activity.  In the early 1800s, scientists began experimenting with light and optics. “Philosophical toys” appeared, both entertaining and sharing scientific advances.
 
One of these new philosophical toys was the kaleidoscope, invented by Scotsman Dr. David Brewster in 1816. The name comes from the Greek words kalos eidos scopos, which means “beautiful form watcher.” The arrangement of mirrors and brightly colored objects in a tube created limitless beautiful patterns that Brewster thought could serve as inspiration for designers and artists.
 
American Charles Bush vastly improved on the kaleidoscope in 1873, patenting new features including a stand and rotating wheel to increase the number of designs. He also introduced the use of ampules, small glass vials filled with liquids of different densities, which allowed for more intricate designs.
 
The kaleidoscope lost popularity among adults as new technologies emerged. However, a 1985 exhibit of over 100 kaleidoscopes brought renewed interest. The Brewster Kaleidoscope Society was soon formed, bringing together both collectors and artists, and encouraging new advancements in kaleidoscope design.

Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the Kaleidoscope Flower stamps using the art of graphic artists Petra and Nicole Kapitza. Each stamp pictures the same flower shape with different colors, creating the illusion that the patterns recede or move forward.

Value: 46¢ first class letter rate
Issued:  January 14, 2013
First Day City:  Kansas City, MO
Type of Stamp: Definitive
Printed by: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products
Method: Offset printing in coils of 3,000 and 10,000
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 11
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 42,500,000 stamps

The Kaleidoscope Flower stamps continue the U.S.P.S. tradition of picturing beautiful flowers on postage.  These stamps were issued in large coils for use by businesses that send large amounts of first-class letters.