#4726a – 2013 First-Class Forever Stamp - Imperforate Chinese Lunar New Year: Year of the Snake

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U.S. # 4726a
2013 45¢ Year of the Snake Imperforate

Celebrating Lunar New Year Series

 

February 10, 2013, marked the beginning of the Year of the Snake.  The New Year is ushered in with lots of noise.  Firecrackers and fireworks are as much a part of the festivities as the parades in the streets.

 

According to legend, long ago a monster called Nian attacked and destroyed villages each spring.  One year, the townspeople threw bamboo in a fire and scared the monster away with the loud popping sounds.  Every year after that, bamboo fires kept Nian at a distance.

 

When gunpowder was invented around the ninth century, firecrackers replaced bamboo and increased the volume of the holiday.  Fireworks create an uproar on a grander scale than little firecrackers, and they are accompanied by a spectacular show.  The New Year begins at the stroke of midnight with dazzling fireworks displays. People of all ages gather in the streets to watch and wish family and friends “smiles of fortune” or “wealth pouring in from all directions.”  No traditional Chinese New Year celebration is complete without fireworks.

 

Art director Ethel Kessler combined artwork by Kam Mak with Clarence Lee’s paper-cut snake design and Lau Bun’s calligraphy to create the 2013 Year of the Snake stamp.  The paper-cut snake and calligraphy are the same style as previous issues in the series.

 

Value: 45¢ first class letter rate

Issued:  January 16, 2013

First Day City:  San Francisco, CA

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 108, with 9 panes of 12
Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

The Year of the Snake stamp is the sixth of 12 in the Celebrating Lunar New Year Series.  The U.S.P.S. issued its first Lunar New Year stamps in 1992.  The current series began in 2008 with each stamp picturing artwork of objects relating to New Year celebrations.

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.   They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today. 

 

 

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U.S. # 4726a
2013 45¢ Year of the Snake Imperforate

Celebrating Lunar New Year Series

 

February 10, 2013, marked the beginning of the Year of the Snake.  The New Year is ushered in with lots of noise.  Firecrackers and fireworks are as much a part of the festivities as the parades in the streets.

 

According to legend, long ago a monster called Nian attacked and destroyed villages each spring.  One year, the townspeople threw bamboo in a fire and scared the monster away with the loud popping sounds.  Every year after that, bamboo fires kept Nian at a distance.

 

When gunpowder was invented around the ninth century, firecrackers replaced bamboo and increased the volume of the holiday.  Fireworks create an uproar on a grander scale than little firecrackers, and they are accompanied by a spectacular show.  The New Year begins at the stroke of midnight with dazzling fireworks displays. People of all ages gather in the streets to watch and wish family and friends “smiles of fortune” or “wealth pouring in from all directions.”  No traditional Chinese New Year celebration is complete without fireworks.

 

Art director Ethel Kessler combined artwork by Kam Mak with Clarence Lee’s paper-cut snake design and Lau Bun’s calligraphy to create the 2013 Year of the Snake stamp.  The paper-cut snake and calligraphy are the same style as previous issues in the series.

 

Value: 45¢ first class letter rate

Issued:  January 16, 2013

First Day City:  San Francisco, CA

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 108, with 9 panes of 12
Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

The Year of the Snake stamp is the sixth of 12 in the Celebrating Lunar New Year Series.  The U.S.P.S. issued its first Lunar New Year stamps in 1992.  The current series began in 2008 with each stamp picturing artwork of objects relating to New Year celebrations.

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.   They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today.