#4730 – 2013 33c Apples, Baldwin

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U.S. # 4730
2013 33¢ Baldwin
Apples

According to legend, an unusual apple seedling was found on a farm in Wilmington, Massachusetts, in 1740.  The seedling matured to become a tree that produced bright red winter apples that remained free from blemishes and blights.  The apples were brought to the attention of Colonel Loammi Baldwin, a local surveyor. Impressed by the thick-skinned fruit with light yellow skin mottled with red and carmine, Baldwin introduced these apple trees throughout eastern Massachusetts.  The Baldwin apple became the most popular apple in New England, where it was widely used for baking and making cider.
 
The original Baldwin apple tree survived until the early 1800s.  A harsh winter in 1934 destroyed many Baldwin orchards developed from that first tree, and the apple variety slipped in popularity.
 
Loammi Baldwin, an accomplished man, died in 1807.  He is called the Father of American Civil Engineering and was present at the Battle of Lexington and Concord.  Baldwin also accompanied Washington when he crossed the Delaware and took part in the Battle of Trenton.  However, Baldwin is best remembered for the apple that bears his name... and for being the cousin of Jonathan Chapman, more often known as Johnny Appleseed.

Artist John Burgoyne created the apple artwork for this stamp using watercolor with pen and ink before adding finishing touches with computer software. 

Value: 33¢ domestic postcard rate
Issued:  January 17, 2013
First Day City:  Yakima, WA
Type of Stamp: Definitive
Printed by: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products
Method: Offset printing in sheets of 200, with 10 panes of 20
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 11 ½ x 10 3/4
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 37,500,000 stamps

Apples have been pictured on U.S. stamps since 1966, when one was issued to honor Johnny Appleseed (U.S. #1317).  Apples were also pictured on a pair of 2001 definitives (U.S. #3491 and #3193), the 2002 Greetings from Washington stamps (U.S. #3607 and #3742) and the 2012 Heart Health stamp (U.S. #4625).

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U.S. # 4730
2013 33¢ Baldwin
Apples

According to legend, an unusual apple seedling was found on a farm in Wilmington, Massachusetts, in 1740.  The seedling matured to become a tree that produced bright red winter apples that remained free from blemishes and blights.  The apples were brought to the attention of Colonel Loammi Baldwin, a local surveyor. Impressed by the thick-skinned fruit with light yellow skin mottled with red and carmine, Baldwin introduced these apple trees throughout eastern Massachusetts.  The Baldwin apple became the most popular apple in New England, where it was widely used for baking and making cider.
 
The original Baldwin apple tree survived until the early 1800s.  A harsh winter in 1934 destroyed many Baldwin orchards developed from that first tree, and the apple variety slipped in popularity.
 
Loammi Baldwin, an accomplished man, died in 1807.  He is called the Father of American Civil Engineering and was present at the Battle of Lexington and Concord.  Baldwin also accompanied Washington when he crossed the Delaware and took part in the Battle of Trenton.  However, Baldwin is best remembered for the apple that bears his name... and for being the cousin of Jonathan Chapman, more often known as Johnny Appleseed.

Artist John Burgoyne created the apple artwork for this stamp using watercolor with pen and ink before adding finishing touches with computer software. 

Value: 33¢ domestic postcard rate
Issued:  January 17, 2013
First Day City:  Yakima, WA
Type of Stamp: Definitive
Printed by: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products
Method: Offset printing in sheets of 200, with 10 panes of 20
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 11 ½ x 10 3/4
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 37,500,000 stamps

Apples have been pictured on U.S. stamps since 1966, when one was issued to honor Johnny Appleseed (U.S. #1317).  Apples were also pictured on a pair of 2001 definitives (U.S. #3491 and #3193), the 2002 Greetings from Washington stamps (U.S. #3607 and #3742) and the 2012 Heart Health stamp (U.S. #4625).