#4748m – 2013 46c Imperf Modern Art in America

U.S. # 4748m
2013 46¢ Modern Art in America Imperforate

 

The beginning of the American Modern Art movement cannot be assigned to a single date.  It had long been common for American artists to travel to Europe.  The artists who went there in the early 1900s discovered new abstract styles, namely Cubism, Futurism, Impressionism, Fauvism, and Dada.  The work of these returning American artists and the Europeans who inspired them were introduced to the American public in 1913.  This took place at the International Exhibition of Modern Art, known to many as simply the Armory Show.

 

Though many art shows have been held at U.S. National Guard armories over the years, this one was the most scandalous.  It marked the first time most Americans saw modern abstract art (though Arthur Dove had displayed his abstract works the year before, which is considered the first public exhibition of abstract art in America).  Among the artists who participated were Stuart Davis, John Marin, Marsden Hartley, Charles Sheeler, Joseph Stella, and Marcel Duchamp.  Many viewers were outraged, including former President Theodore Roosevelt, who proclaimed, “That’s not art!”

 

In spite of the public reaction, many artists in attendance were inspired and joined the modern art movement.  These included Man Ray and Aaron Douglas.  The work of all these artists paved the way for more abstract art in America by such artists as Charles DeMuth, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Gerald Murphy.

 

Though inspired by European artists, American Modern Art is a distinct style all its own.  While it encompasses several styles, the subjects are all American, either embracing or rejecting the industrial age that was sweeping the nation.

   

The Modern Art stamps are all unusual sizes and arranged look like paintings in art gallery.  Each stamp pictures the paintings and includes the artists’ name.  The back of the pane includes the painting title, date, and information about artist.  The pane was designed by Margaret Bauer. 

 

Value: 46¢ First-Class letter rate

Issued:  March 7, 2013

First Day City:  New York, NY

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 48, in 4 panes of 12
Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

The U.S.P.S. has issued other stamps honoring American artists over the years.  Three of the artists featured on this sheet have been honored on U.S. stamps before: Georgia O’Keeffe (U.S. #3069), Marcel Duchamp (U.S. #3183d), and Man Ray (U.S. #3649).

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.   They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today. 

 

 

 

Read More - Click Here

  • U.S. Album with 100 postally used stamps, 1,000 hinges, and a free stamp collecting guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. # 4748m
2013 46¢ Modern Art in America Imperforate

 

The beginning of the American Modern Art movement cannot be assigned to a single date.  It had long been common for American artists to travel to Europe.  The artists who went there in the early 1900s discovered new abstract styles, namely Cubism, Futurism, Impressionism, Fauvism, and Dada.  The work of these returning American artists and the Europeans who inspired them were introduced to the American public in 1913.  This took place at the International Exhibition of Modern Art, known to many as simply the Armory Show.

 

Though many art shows have been held at U.S. National Guard armories over the years, this one was the most scandalous.  It marked the first time most Americans saw modern abstract art (though Arthur Dove had displayed his abstract works the year before, which is considered the first public exhibition of abstract art in America).  Among the artists who participated were Stuart Davis, John Marin, Marsden Hartley, Charles Sheeler, Joseph Stella, and Marcel Duchamp.  Many viewers were outraged, including former President Theodore Roosevelt, who proclaimed, “That’s not art!”

 

In spite of the public reaction, many artists in attendance were inspired and joined the modern art movement.  These included Man Ray and Aaron Douglas.  The work of all these artists paved the way for more abstract art in America by such artists as Charles DeMuth, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Gerald Murphy.

 

Though inspired by European artists, American Modern Art is a distinct style all its own.  While it encompasses several styles, the subjects are all American, either embracing or rejecting the industrial age that was sweeping the nation.

   

The Modern Art stamps are all unusual sizes and arranged look like paintings in art gallery.  Each stamp pictures the paintings and includes the artists’ name.  The back of the pane includes the painting title, date, and information about artist.  The pane was designed by Margaret Bauer. 

 

Value: 46¢ First-Class letter rate

Issued:  March 7, 2013

First Day City:  New York, NY

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 48, in 4 panes of 12
Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

The U.S.P.S. has issued other stamps honoring American artists over the years.  Three of the artists featured on this sheet have been honored on U.S. stamps before: Georgia O’Keeffe (U.S. #3069), Marcel Duchamp (U.S. #3183d), and Man Ray (U.S. #3649).

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.   They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today.