#4751 – 2013 First-Class Forever Stamp - La Florida: Yellow Cannas, "Forever" in upper right corner

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U.S. # 4751
2013 46¢ Yellow Cannas
La Florida

Also known as the “bandana of the Everglades,” the yellow cannas thrive in full sun and shallow water, making Florida’s marshes and ponds ideal habitats. Often called a canna lily, this plant is actually a member of the Zingiberales order, which includes ginger and bananas. The confusion may be a result of the resemblance of its leaves to lilies, but its flower also looks enough like an orchid to have once earned it the title “Orchid-Flowered Canna.”
 
The origin of the yellow cannas has also been shrouded in confusion and misinformation. Cannas are native to the warm areas of the Americas. They were taken to the warm regions of the Orient, which was once called the East Indies, and then on to Europe. Botanists later discovered cannas in Africa and Asia and thought they came from India. After that, they were “discovered” in the Americas for the second time. Centuries passed before scientists learned the truth.
 
Cannas plants do more than brighten the landscape. The roots can be boiled or baked. Young shoots can be eaten as a green vegetable, and the starch may be used like arrowroot. The mature seeds cannot be sprinkled on food and eaten as some people claim, as they are actually so hard they have been used for buckshot.
  
Ethel Kessler designed the La Florida stamps using artwork created by Steve Buchanan.  The stamps were designed to stand as separate images and work together as one.  According to Kessler, Buchanan “brought the subjects together beautifully and broke them apart beautifully.”

Value: 46¢ First-Class letter rate
Issued:  April 3, 2013 – 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leon’s naming of Florida
First Day City:  St. Augustine, FL at the Juan Ponce de Leon Dia de Fiesta
Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by: Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 160, in 10 panes of 16
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 10 ½ x 10 ¾
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:
23,000,000 stamps

In a poll among readers of Linn’s Stamp News, the La Florida se-tenant was voted the best-design U.S. commemorative stamps.   

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U.S. # 4751
2013 46¢ Yellow Cannas
La Florida

Also known as the “bandana of the Everglades,” the yellow cannas thrive in full sun and shallow water, making Florida’s marshes and ponds ideal habitats. Often called a canna lily, this plant is actually a member of the Zingiberales order, which includes ginger and bananas. The confusion may be a result of the resemblance of its leaves to lilies, but its flower also looks enough like an orchid to have once earned it the title “Orchid-Flowered Canna.”
 
The origin of the yellow cannas has also been shrouded in confusion and misinformation. Cannas are native to the warm areas of the Americas. They were taken to the warm regions of the Orient, which was once called the East Indies, and then on to Europe. Botanists later discovered cannas in Africa and Asia and thought they came from India. After that, they were “discovered” in the Americas for the second time. Centuries passed before scientists learned the truth.
 
Cannas plants do more than brighten the landscape. The roots can be boiled or baked. Young shoots can be eaten as a green vegetable, and the starch may be used like arrowroot. The mature seeds cannot be sprinkled on food and eaten as some people claim, as they are actually so hard they have been used for buckshot.
  
Ethel Kessler designed the La Florida stamps using artwork created by Steve Buchanan.  The stamps were designed to stand as separate images and work together as one.  According to Kessler, Buchanan “brought the subjects together beautifully and broke them apart beautifully.”

Value: 46¢ First-Class letter rate
Issued:  April 3, 2013 – 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leon’s naming of Florida
First Day City:  St. Augustine, FL at the Juan Ponce de Leon Dia de Fiesta
Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by: Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 160, in 10 panes of 16
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 10 ½ x 10 ¾
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:
23,000,000 stamps

In a poll among readers of Linn’s Stamp News, the La Florida se-tenant was voted the best-design U.S. commemorative stamps.