#4764a – 2014 49c Where Dreams Blossom

U.S. # 4764a
2014 49¢ Where Dreams Blossom

Weddings Series

 

While the types have changed, flowers have been an important part of weddings for thousands of years.  In ancient Greece, the bride’s bouquet contained bulbs of garlic and sprigs of dill or sage.  The garlic warded off evil spirits, the dill ensured the bride would only desire her husband, and the sage promised wisdom and goodness.  Herbs were also used in Swedish weddings.  The groom put thyme in his pocket to discourage trolls from becoming uninvited guests.  Young girls walked down the aisle carrying small bouquets of herbs.

 

In England, a small girl led the bride and groom to the church, sprinkling blossoms along the path to bring long life and happiness to the couple.  This tradition has survived through time, and the flower girl is a common sight at many modern weddings.

 

In 1840, England’s Queen Victoria began a fashion trend when she carried a “Tussie Mussie” at her wedding.  This small bouquet included flowers with special meaning, such as roses for love and poppies that represented the pleasure her new husband would bring to her life.

 

Whether the bride’s bouquet includes garlic or poppies, this long-standing tradition is a symbol of future joy.

 

As with the “Yes I Do” Heart of Roses stamp, the “Where Dreams Blossom” Wedding Bouquet stamp was designed by Ethel Kessler using an illustration by Michael Osborne.  This stylized bouquet stamp was issued for use on the save-the-date notices, response cards, and thank-you notes. 

 

Value: 49¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  May 2, 2014

First Day City:  Acton, MA

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Banknote Corporation of America for Senate Security Products
Method: Offset printing in sheets of 160 in 8 panes of 20
Perforation: Die Cut 10 3/4

Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 50,000,000 stamps

The U.S.P.S. has been issuing Wedding stamps since 2004.  The stamps always feature images of love, romance, and wedding traditions.  These include bouquets, hearts, rings, and cakes.

 

 

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U.S. # 4764a
2014 49¢ Where Dreams Blossom

Weddings Series

 

While the types have changed, flowers have been an important part of weddings for thousands of years.  In ancient Greece, the bride’s bouquet contained bulbs of garlic and sprigs of dill or sage.  The garlic warded off evil spirits, the dill ensured the bride would only desire her husband, and the sage promised wisdom and goodness.  Herbs were also used in Swedish weddings.  The groom put thyme in his pocket to discourage trolls from becoming uninvited guests.  Young girls walked down the aisle carrying small bouquets of herbs.

 

In England, a small girl led the bride and groom to the church, sprinkling blossoms along the path to bring long life and happiness to the couple.  This tradition has survived through time, and the flower girl is a common sight at many modern weddings.

 

In 1840, England’s Queen Victoria began a fashion trend when she carried a “Tussie Mussie” at her wedding.  This small bouquet included flowers with special meaning, such as roses for love and poppies that represented the pleasure her new husband would bring to her life.

 

Whether the bride’s bouquet includes garlic or poppies, this long-standing tradition is a symbol of future joy.

 

As with the “Yes I Do” Heart of Roses stamp, the “Where Dreams Blossom” Wedding Bouquet stamp was designed by Ethel Kessler using an illustration by Michael Osborne.  This stylized bouquet stamp was issued for use on the save-the-date notices, response cards, and thank-you notes. 

 

Value: 49¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  May 2, 2014

First Day City:  Acton, MA

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Banknote Corporation of America for Senate Security Products
Method: Offset printing in sheets of 160 in 8 panes of 20
Perforation: Die Cut 10 3/4

Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 50,000,000 stamps

The U.S.P.S. has been issuing Wedding stamps since 2004.  The stamps always feature images of love, romance, and wedding traditions.  These include bouquets, hearts, rings, and cakes.