#4790a – 2013 First-Class Forever Stamp - Imperforate Statehood: West Virginia Sesquicentennial

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U.S. # 4790a
2013 46¢ West Virginia Statehood Imperforate

 

West Virginia was the only state to secede from the Confederacy during the Civil War. Upon separating from Virginia, it became the one state in the Union to have its sovereignty established by presidential proclamation.

 

The discord among Virginians was apparent long before the Civil War. Residents in the state’s mountainous western region were largely German, Protestant Scotch-Irish, and pioneers who had migrated from the north. The rugged landscape made slavery unprofitable. In the east and south, old Virginia families relied heavily upon the institution to sustain their plantations. Representation in the state government was slanted toward them to the disfavor of the westerners. When Virginia seceded from the Union, loyalists in the west set up a rival government that was granted U.S. statehood on June 20, 1863.

 

Once called the “Child of the Storm” because of its Civil War origin, West Virginia became known for rich mineral resources. The discovery of a vast supply of black coal during the late 1800s bolstered its economy and helped fuel the Industrial Revolution. But it is the untamed natural beauty of the “Mountain State” that draws visitors, inspires natives, and led John Denver to immortalize West Virginia as “almost heaven” in his song “Take Me Home, Country Roads.”

 

Designed by Greg Breeding, the West Virginia statehood stamp reproduces a 2008 photograph by Roger Spencer of the sunrise in the Monongahela National Forest.    

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  June 20, 2013  – date of admission to the Union in 1863

First Day City: Charleston, WV – state capital

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 20 in 10 panes of 20
Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

Though not a specified series, the U.S.P.S. has been issuing stamps commemorating the admission of individual states to the Union since 1935 (U.S. #775 honoring Michigan).  During that time, West Virginia was also honored in 1963 with a stamp (U.S. #1232) honoring the 100th anniversary of statehood.

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.   They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today. 

 

 

 

 

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U.S. # 4790a
2013 46¢ West Virginia Statehood Imperforate

 

West Virginia was the only state to secede from the Confederacy during the Civil War. Upon separating from Virginia, it became the one state in the Union to have its sovereignty established by presidential proclamation.

 

The discord among Virginians was apparent long before the Civil War. Residents in the state’s mountainous western region were largely German, Protestant Scotch-Irish, and pioneers who had migrated from the north. The rugged landscape made slavery unprofitable. In the east and south, old Virginia families relied heavily upon the institution to sustain their plantations. Representation in the state government was slanted toward them to the disfavor of the westerners. When Virginia seceded from the Union, loyalists in the west set up a rival government that was granted U.S. statehood on June 20, 1863.

 

Once called the “Child of the Storm” because of its Civil War origin, West Virginia became known for rich mineral resources. The discovery of a vast supply of black coal during the late 1800s bolstered its economy and helped fuel the Industrial Revolution. But it is the untamed natural beauty of the “Mountain State” that draws visitors, inspires natives, and led John Denver to immortalize West Virginia as “almost heaven” in his song “Take Me Home, Country Roads.”

 

Designed by Greg Breeding, the West Virginia statehood stamp reproduces a 2008 photograph by Roger Spencer of the sunrise in the Monongahela National Forest.    

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  June 20, 2013  – date of admission to the Union in 1863

First Day City: Charleston, WV – state capital

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 20 in 10 panes of 20
Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

Though not a specified series, the U.S.P.S. has been issuing stamps commemorating the admission of individual states to the Union since 1935 (U.S. #775 honoring Michigan).  During that time, West Virginia was also honored in 1963 with a stamp (U.S. #1232) honoring the 100th anniversary of statehood.

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.   They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today.