#4800 – 2013 First-Class Forever Stamp - EID Greetings

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.90
$1.90
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.50
$1.50
7 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM216430x37mm 5 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$0.95
$0.95

U.S. # 4800
2013 46¢ Eid Greetings

 

During the last month of the Islamic calendar, millions of Muslims travel to Saudi Arabia for the annual Hajj, or pilgrimage. Every Muslim who is financially and physically able is required to make the journey to the desert city of Mecca at least once during their lifetime. 

 

The Hajj commemorates the trials and triumphs of the Prophet Abraham and his family. Muslims recall when Abraham was commanded by Allah, the Muslim name for God, to sacrifice his son, Ishmael. An angel stopped Abraham’s hand before he performed the sacrifice, and Allah provided a ram in Ishmael’s place.

 

The end of the Hajj is marked by Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice. During the festival, Muslims commemorate Abraham’s obedience to God by sacrificing a lamb, goat, or camel. The meat is divided into thirds, with the family keeping part, giving some to relatives and friends, and donating the last portion to the poor so they can enjoy a meal as well.

 

Eid al-Adha is a joyous celebration where participants express their thankfulness for God’s mercy. Though crowds of people travel to Mecca each year for the Hajj and Eid, many more Muslims express their appreciation to Allah in their local mosques and homes.

 

Designed by Phil Jordan, the 2013 Eid stamp portrays calligraphy created by Mohamed Zakariya.  The writing means Eid Mubarak, which translates to “blessed festival.” 

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate
Issued:  August 8, 2013
First Day City:  Milwaukee, WI at the American Philatelic Society Stamp Show
Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Ashton Potter USA Ltd.
Method: Lithograph printing in sheets of 160 in 8 panes of 20
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 11

Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 5,500,000 stamps


The first U.S. stamp to honor the Muslim holidays of Eid ul-Fitr and Eid ul-Adha was issued in 2001.  The 2013 issue was the eighth to commemorate the holiday and features a similar design to the 2011 stamp, except with a different color background. 

Read More - Click Here


  • Latvia Map Stamps - Imperforate block of 16 with map on reverse, one imperforate single plus FREE album page and mounts Latvia Map Stamps

    Own rare World War I stamp artifacts most collectors have never even seen.  The first stamps of Latvia – printed on German military maps over 100 years ago. Order yours today!

    $36.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1989 German First Day Cards - mix of 10, selection may vary 10 Germany First Day Cards From 1989
    In 1989, the dreaded Berlin Wall was finally brought down in Germany, reuniting the West and East. Now you can get a set of 10 Germany First Day Cards issued the same year Germany became one nation again. Contents may vary and our supply is limited, order yours soon!
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Hollywood Full Pane Cover Mix - selections may vary Legends of Hollywood Full Pan Cover Mix
    These panes are really neat – they feature additional images of each star plus a brief biography.  These full pane covers were produced in small numbers. Selections vary – let us choose five covers to add to your collection today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. # 4800
2013 46¢ Eid Greetings

 

During the last month of the Islamic calendar, millions of Muslims travel to Saudi Arabia for the annual Hajj, or pilgrimage. Every Muslim who is financially and physically able is required to make the journey to the desert city of Mecca at least once during their lifetime. 

 

The Hajj commemorates the trials and triumphs of the Prophet Abraham and his family. Muslims recall when Abraham was commanded by Allah, the Muslim name for God, to sacrifice his son, Ishmael. An angel stopped Abraham’s hand before he performed the sacrifice, and Allah provided a ram in Ishmael’s place.

 

The end of the Hajj is marked by Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice. During the festival, Muslims commemorate Abraham’s obedience to God by sacrificing a lamb, goat, or camel. The meat is divided into thirds, with the family keeping part, giving some to relatives and friends, and donating the last portion to the poor so they can enjoy a meal as well.

 

Eid al-Adha is a joyous celebration where participants express their thankfulness for God’s mercy. Though crowds of people travel to Mecca each year for the Hajj and Eid, many more Muslims express their appreciation to Allah in their local mosques and homes.

 

Designed by Phil Jordan, the 2013 Eid stamp portrays calligraphy created by Mohamed Zakariya.  The writing means Eid Mubarak, which translates to “blessed festival.” 

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate
Issued:  August 8, 2013
First Day City:  Milwaukee, WI at the American Philatelic Society Stamp Show
Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Ashton Potter USA Ltd.
Method: Lithograph printing in sheets of 160 in 8 panes of 20
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 11

Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 5,500,000 stamps


The first U.S. stamp to honor the Muslim holidays of Eid ul-Fitr and Eid ul-Adha was issued in 2001.  The 2013 issue was the eighth to commemorate the holiday and features a similar design to the 2011 stamp, except with a different color background.