#4806c – 2013 $2 Imperf Inverted Jenny Single

U.S. # 4806c
2013 $2 Inverted Jenny Imperforate Single

 

Nearly a century ago, the purchase of a single pane of U.S. stamps turned the collecting world upside down. The “Jenny Invert” became the world’s most famous stamp, and the 100 examples were eagerly sought after by prominent collectors. Billionaire investor Bill Gross was one of them.

 

In 2005, Gross paid $2.97 million to buy the unique Jenny Invert Plate-Number Block. He then exchanged the block of four stamps for the 1868 1¢ Z Grill owned by Don Sundman, president of Mystic Stamp Company, in a one-for-one trade that made international headlines.

 

Another block of four Jenny Inverts is on permanent display at the National Postal Museum in Washington, D.C., courtesy of Mr. Gross. The display was unveiled at the opening of the museum’s new gallery, which was funded largely by his generosity. Named in his honor, the William H. Gross Stamp Gallery is the world’s largest philatelic showcase. The 12,000-square-foot facility houses some of the greatest stamp rarities and is a mecca for collectors around the world.

 

To commemorate the gallery’s opening in 2013, the U.S. Postal Service issued a souvenir sheet of six $2 Jenny Inverts. This sheet was printed using plates created from the original 1918 dies. Now collectors can see the legendary Jenny Inverts on display and add a reprint of the famous “Upside-Down Airplane” stamps to their own collection.

 

The selvage artwork around the stamps pictures the National Postal Museum, aviation pioneer Reuben H. Fleet, a map of the first scheduled Air Mail route, and a compass rose. 

 

Value: $2 – to distinguish from the 24¢ 1918 original

Issued:  September 22, 2013

First Day City:  Washington, D.C.

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Banknote Corporation of America Inc., for Sennett Security Products
Method: Offset printing in sheets of 108 in 18 panes of 6
Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

Click here to learn more about America’s first Air Mail flight and here to discover more neat history behind the Jenny Invert.

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today. 

 

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U.S. # 4806c
2013 $2 Inverted Jenny Imperforate Single

 

Nearly a century ago, the purchase of a single pane of U.S. stamps turned the collecting world upside down. The “Jenny Invert” became the world’s most famous stamp, and the 100 examples were eagerly sought after by prominent collectors. Billionaire investor Bill Gross was one of them.

 

In 2005, Gross paid $2.97 million to buy the unique Jenny Invert Plate-Number Block. He then exchanged the block of four stamps for the 1868 1¢ Z Grill owned by Don Sundman, president of Mystic Stamp Company, in a one-for-one trade that made international headlines.

 

Another block of four Jenny Inverts is on permanent display at the National Postal Museum in Washington, D.C., courtesy of Mr. Gross. The display was unveiled at the opening of the museum’s new gallery, which was funded largely by his generosity. Named in his honor, the William H. Gross Stamp Gallery is the world’s largest philatelic showcase. The 12,000-square-foot facility houses some of the greatest stamp rarities and is a mecca for collectors around the world.

 

To commemorate the gallery’s opening in 2013, the U.S. Postal Service issued a souvenir sheet of six $2 Jenny Inverts. This sheet was printed using plates created from the original 1918 dies. Now collectors can see the legendary Jenny Inverts on display and add a reprint of the famous “Upside-Down Airplane” stamps to their own collection.

 

The selvage artwork around the stamps pictures the National Postal Museum, aviation pioneer Reuben H. Fleet, a map of the first scheduled Air Mail route, and a compass rose. 

 

Value: $2 – to distinguish from the 24¢ 1918 original

Issued:  September 22, 2013

First Day City:  Washington, D.C.

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Banknote Corporation of America Inc., for Sennett Security Products
Method: Offset printing in sheets of 108 in 18 panes of 6
Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

Click here to learn more about America’s first Air Mail flight and here to discover more neat history behind the Jenny Invert.

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today.