#4822 – 2013 First-Class Forever Stamp - The Medal of Honor: World War II - Navy

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U.S. #4822
2013 46¢ Navy
Medal of Honor: World War II
 
Issue Date: November 11, 2013
City:
Washington, D.C.
Quantity:
10,500,000
Printed By:
Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Offset
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 11
Color:
multicolored
 
In 2013, the U.S. Postal Service issued a set of two stamps commemorating the 464 men who received the Medal of Honor during World War II. Photos of the last twelve living recipients were pictured on the front of the prestige folio, a new stamp format, with the names of all those rewarded printed in the back. 
 
The Navy was the first branch of the U.S. military to propose a decoration for bravery during battle. On December 21, 1861, President Lincoln signed the provision to establish a Navy medal of valor for sailors who show exceptional “gallantry and other seamen-like qualities.” Awarding a Medal of Honor became a proud tradition in the Navy.
 
For brave acts during the attack on Pearl Harbor, some outstanding servicemen earned the right to wear the Medal of Honor. One of the fifteen men was Captain Cassin Young (1894-1942).
 
After graduating from the Naval Academy, Young commanded submarines and destroyers. On December 7, 1941, he was the head officer on the repair ship USS Vestal. When the attack began, his vessel was moored to the battleship USS Arizona. While the ammunition exploded on the battleship, Young was thrown overboard. Determined to save his ship, he swam back and guided the damaged Vestal to safety. The captain received the Medal of Honor for his fearless actions.
 
Captain Young’s Medal of Honor is on display at the Naval Academy Museum. His example of extreme courage under fire is an inspiration to those who will command America’s Navy in the future.

 

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U.S. #4822
2013 46¢ Navy
Medal of Honor: World War II
 
Issue Date: November 11, 2013
City:
Washington, D.C.
Quantity:
10,500,000
Printed By:
Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Offset
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 11
Color:
multicolored
 
In 2013, the U.S. Postal Service issued a set of two stamps commemorating the 464 men who received the Medal of Honor during World War II. Photos of the last twelve living recipients were pictured on the front of the prestige folio, a new stamp format, with the names of all those rewarded printed in the back. 
 
The Navy was the first branch of the U.S. military to propose a decoration for bravery during battle. On December 21, 1861, President Lincoln signed the provision to establish a Navy medal of valor for sailors who show exceptional “gallantry and other seamen-like qualities.” Awarding a Medal of Honor became a proud tradition in the Navy.
 
For brave acts during the attack on Pearl Harbor, some outstanding servicemen earned the right to wear the Medal of Honor. One of the fifteen men was Captain Cassin Young (1894-1942).
 
After graduating from the Naval Academy, Young commanded submarines and destroyers. On December 7, 1941, he was the head officer on the repair ship USS Vestal. When the attack began, his vessel was moored to the battleship USS Arizona. While the ammunition exploded on the battleship, Young was thrown overboard. Determined to save his ship, he swam back and guided the damaged Vestal to safety. The captain received the Medal of Honor for his fearless actions.
 
Captain Young’s Medal of Honor is on display at the Naval Academy Museum. His example of extreme courage under fire is an inspiration to those who will command America’s Navy in the future.