#4845a – 2013 First-Class Forever Stamp - Imperforate Kwanzaa

U.S. # 4845a
2013 46¢ Kwanzaa Imperforate

Holiday Celebrations

  

As December 26th approaches, African-American families select their best fruits and vegetables. They also gather symbols of their ancestry, especially a kinara (candle holder), to celebrate Kwanzaa. It is a time to reflect on the past while reinforcing the bonds of unity in families and communities.

 

The name for the seven-day festival means “first fruits” in Swahili and is reminiscent of African harvest festivals. A straw or cloth mkeka, or mat, represents African-American history and culture. Other elements of the Kwanzaa observance are laid on the mat. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and nuts arranged on the mkeka are reminders of what can be accomplished when people work together. They are also signs of thanksgiving for prosperity.

 

The muhindi (corn) represents the promise of the future. An ear of corn is placed on the mat for each child in the family. If there are no children in the home, two ears are positioned for the youth in the community who need guidance and support from adults.

 

Kwanzaa is a time to make a renewed commitment of working together to strengthen African-American culture. By applying the holiday’s principles, communities can accomplish the goal of Dr. Maulana Karenga, the celebration’s creator, “to constantly bring good into the world.” 

 

The Kwanzaa stamp (with artwork by artist R. Gregory Christie) shows a man, woman, and child in traditional African clothing celebrating Kwanzaa. The seven candles represent the principles of the holiday. The open book symbolizes knowledge.

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  November 26, 2013

First Day City:  Philadelphia, PA

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Ashton Potter USA Ltd.
Method: Offset printing in sheets of 160 in 8 panes of 20

Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

In 1996, the U.S.P.S. introduced the Holiday Celebrations series, honoring different cultural and ethnic holidays.  The first U.S. Kwanzaa stamp was issued the following year.  Click here to learn more about the Kwanzaa stamp series.

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today. 

 

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U.S. # 4845a
2013 46¢ Kwanzaa Imperforate

Holiday Celebrations

  

As December 26th approaches, African-American families select their best fruits and vegetables. They also gather symbols of their ancestry, especially a kinara (candle holder), to celebrate Kwanzaa. It is a time to reflect on the past while reinforcing the bonds of unity in families and communities.

 

The name for the seven-day festival means “first fruits” in Swahili and is reminiscent of African harvest festivals. A straw or cloth mkeka, or mat, represents African-American history and culture. Other elements of the Kwanzaa observance are laid on the mat. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and nuts arranged on the mkeka are reminders of what can be accomplished when people work together. They are also signs of thanksgiving for prosperity.

 

The muhindi (corn) represents the promise of the future. An ear of corn is placed on the mat for each child in the family. If there are no children in the home, two ears are positioned for the youth in the community who need guidance and support from adults.

 

Kwanzaa is a time to make a renewed commitment of working together to strengthen African-American culture. By applying the holiday’s principles, communities can accomplish the goal of Dr. Maulana Karenga, the celebration’s creator, “to constantly bring good into the world.” 

 

The Kwanzaa stamp (with artwork by artist R. Gregory Christie) shows a man, woman, and child in traditional African clothing celebrating Kwanzaa. The seven candles represent the principles of the holiday. The open book symbolizes knowledge.

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  November 26, 2013

First Day City:  Philadelphia, PA

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Ashton Potter USA Ltd.
Method: Offset printing in sheets of 160 in 8 panes of 20

Perforation: Imperforate

Self-Adhesive

In 1996, the U.S.P.S. introduced the Holiday Celebrations series, honoring different cultural and ethnic holidays.  The first U.S. Kwanzaa stamp was issued the following year.  Click here to learn more about the Kwanzaa stamp series.

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today.