#4910-11b – 2014 49c Imperf Civil War 1864

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U.S. #4910-11b

2014 49¢ Civil War Imperforate

Pair

 

These stamps are the fourth installment in a series commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. They picture the 22nd United States Colored Troops at the Battle of Petersburg and Admiral Farragut’s fleet during the Battle of Mobile Bay.

 

Following his successful siege of Vicksburg and victory at Chattanooga the previous year, Ulysses S. Grant was promoted to general-in-chief of the Union Army in March 1864. In the months that followed, Grant began persistent campaigns against the under-resourced Confederacy.

 

The Union was poised toward victory and prepared to beat down the enemy. Unlike many commanders, Grant did not pull back after a victory, nor did he retreat after a loss. Throughout 1864, the Union Army relentlessly pursued the Confederates, dealing blow after blow to the South. Casualties were overwhelming on both sides, but Southern losses were irreplaceable. The North suffered tactical defeats but gained an overall strategic advantage as the South’s resources were strained to the brink.

 

By the end of 1864, General Robert E. Lee was trapped in the Confederate capital of Richmond with supply lines cut off and resources dwindling by the day. Atlanta, Savannah, and Nashville were lost and the last significant Confederate port, Mobile Bay, had been seized by summer’s end. The successes improved Northern morale and President Lincoln was reelected that November. The tide had turned in the Union’s favor and the end of the War Between the States was soon to follow. 

 

49¢ Civil War Sesquicentennial, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate

Issue Date: July 30, 2014

City: Petersburg, VA

Category: Commemorative

Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products

Printing Method: Lithographed in double-sided sheets of 72 with six panes of 12 per sheet

Perforations: Imperforate

Self-adhesive

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today. 

 

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    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

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  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

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U.S. #4910-11b

2014 49¢ Civil War Imperforate

Pair

 

These stamps are the fourth installment in a series commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. They picture the 22nd United States Colored Troops at the Battle of Petersburg and Admiral Farragut’s fleet during the Battle of Mobile Bay.

 

Following his successful siege of Vicksburg and victory at Chattanooga the previous year, Ulysses S. Grant was promoted to general-in-chief of the Union Army in March 1864. In the months that followed, Grant began persistent campaigns against the under-resourced Confederacy.

 

The Union was poised toward victory and prepared to beat down the enemy. Unlike many commanders, Grant did not pull back after a victory, nor did he retreat after a loss. Throughout 1864, the Union Army relentlessly pursued the Confederates, dealing blow after blow to the South. Casualties were overwhelming on both sides, but Southern losses were irreplaceable. The North suffered tactical defeats but gained an overall strategic advantage as the South’s resources were strained to the brink.

 

By the end of 1864, General Robert E. Lee was trapped in the Confederate capital of Richmond with supply lines cut off and resources dwindling by the day. Atlanta, Savannah, and Nashville were lost and the last significant Confederate port, Mobile Bay, had been seized by summer’s end. The successes improved Northern morale and President Lincoln was reelected that November. The tide had turned in the Union’s favor and the end of the War Between the States was soon to follow. 

 

49¢ Civil War Sesquicentennial, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate

Issue Date: July 30, 2014

City: Petersburg, VA

Category: Commemorative

Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products

Printing Method: Lithographed in double-sided sheets of 72 with six panes of 12 per sheet

Perforations: Imperforate

Self-adhesive

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today.