#4952a – 2015 49c Imperf War of 1812: New Orleans

U.S. #4952a Imperforate
2015 49¢ Battle of New Orleans
War of 1812
 
The stamp is the fourth and final issue in the War of 1812 commemorative series. It was issued for the 200th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans, the last major battle of the War of 1812. 
 
The stamp shows American troops and artillery behind their mile-long defensive lines keeping the British from approaching. Major General Andrew Jackson can be seen on his horse rallying the men.
 
America’s greatest victory in the War of 1812 came two weeks after the war ended. In late December 1814, peace terms had been negotiated in Ghent, Belgium. But news of the treaty was slow to reach the United States, too slow to prevent the Battle of New Orleans.
 
Earlier that same December, the British had begun to move in on New Orleans. They knew that control of the Mississippi River could win the war. General Andrew Jackson was sent to defend the city. His ragtag army dug a mile of heavily fortified defenses just five miles south of New Orleans. On January 8, 1815, the British assault began.
 
Jackson’s men were a mishmash of militia, soldiers, sailors, farmers, and pirates. But many were skilled sharpshooters and they were ready for the attack. Within an hour, the redcoats had lost more than 2,000 men to Jackson’s 71. Unable to break through the defensive lines, the British withdrew.
 
The victory at New Orleans was not decisive in the outcome of the war. But it renewed American patriotism and ensured the U.S. ratification of the Treaty of Ghent. It also made the 47-year-old Andrew Jackson a national hero, paving the path to his presidency over a decade later.
  In 1965, U.S. #1261 was issued to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans.
 
Value: Forever (49¢) first-class letter rate
Issue Date: January 8, 2015 – the 200th anniversary of the battle
City: Chalmette, LA, site of battle
Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed By: CCL Label, Inc.
Method: Photogravure, printed in sheets of 100, with five Souvenir Sheets of 20 per sheet.
Gummed or Self-adhesive: Self-Adhesive
Designed by: Greg Harlin, an artist who specializes in historical paintings
 
Read More - Click Here

  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4952a Imperforate
2015 49¢ Battle of New Orleans
War of 1812
 
The stamp is the fourth and final issue in the War of 1812 commemorative series. It was issued for the 200th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans, the last major battle of the War of 1812. 
 
The stamp shows American troops and artillery behind their mile-long defensive lines keeping the British from approaching. Major General Andrew Jackson can be seen on his horse rallying the men.
 
America’s greatest victory in the War of 1812 came two weeks after the war ended. In late December 1814, peace terms had been negotiated in Ghent, Belgium. But news of the treaty was slow to reach the United States, too slow to prevent the Battle of New Orleans.
 
Earlier that same December, the British had begun to move in on New Orleans. They knew that control of the Mississippi River could win the war. General Andrew Jackson was sent to defend the city. His ragtag army dug a mile of heavily fortified defenses just five miles south of New Orleans. On January 8, 1815, the British assault began.
 
Jackson’s men were a mishmash of militia, soldiers, sailors, farmers, and pirates. But many were skilled sharpshooters and they were ready for the attack. Within an hour, the redcoats had lost more than 2,000 men to Jackson’s 71. Unable to break through the defensive lines, the British withdrew.
 
The victory at New Orleans was not decisive in the outcome of the war. But it renewed American patriotism and ensured the U.S. ratification of the Treaty of Ghent. It also made the 47-year-old Andrew Jackson a national hero, paving the path to his presidency over a decade later.

 

In 1965, U.S. #1261 was issued to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans.

 
Value: Forever (49¢) first-class letter rate
Issue Date: January 8, 2015 – the 200th anniversary of the battle
City: Chalmette, LA, site of battle
Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed By: CCL Label, Inc.
Method: Photogravure, printed in sheets of 100, with five Souvenir Sheets of 20 per sheet.
Gummed or Self-adhesive: Self-Adhesive
Designed by: Greg Harlin, an artist who specializes in historical paintings