#5065-68 – 2016 First-Class Forever Stamp - Distinguished Service Cross Medals

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 2-4 business days.i$7.95FREE with 1,660 points!
$7.95
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 2-4 business days.i$6.25
$6.25
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM646215x49mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 2-4 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM62232x47mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 2-4 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75
- MM420932x47mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 2-4 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75
- MM611657x86mm 2 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 2-4 business days.i
$1.00
$1.00
U.S. #5065-68
2016 47c Distinguished Service Cross Medals
 
 At the outset of World War I, the only U.S. military award, aside from the Medal of Honor, was the Certificate of Merit Medal. Established in 1905, this medal had replaced older honors recognizing distinguished service in times of both war and peace.  But short of the Medal of Honor, there was no distinct award for valor in the face of death during combat.  

General John J. Pershing, commander in chief of the American Expeditionary Forces in France, felt the U.S. should have an honor for gallantry and risk-of-life in addition – and secondary to – the Medal of Honor.  He proposed the idea to President Woodrow Wilson, and the Distinguished Service Cross was authorized in 1918.  It was then awarded retroactively to 1917, and several even-older merit medals were upgraded.

Originally, the service cross was established to cover all people who acted on behalf of the U.S. military with extraordinary heroism in a combat situation.  But over time, the other military branches created their own service cross medals.  Today, second only to the Medal of Honor, there are now four service cross medals for the separate U.S. military branches: the Army’s Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross, the Air Force Cross, and the Coast Guard Cross.

 
Value:  47c
Issued: May 30, 2016
First Day City:  New York, NY
Type of Stamp:  First Class Mail
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Method:  Offset, Microprint
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  20,400,000
 
The Distinguished Service Cross issue recognizes the second-highest Army award for military valor in combat.  Richard Frasier's photograph of the medal was used by art director Greg Breeding to design the stamp.
Read More - Click Here


U.S. #5065-68
2016 47c Distinguished Service Cross Medals
 
 At the outset of World War I, the only U.S. military award, aside from the Medal of Honor, was the Certificate of Merit Medal. Established in 1905, this medal had replaced older honors recognizing distinguished service in times of both war and peace.  But short of the Medal of Honor, there was no distinct award for valor in the face of death during combat.  

General John J. Pershing, commander in chief of the American Expeditionary Forces in France, felt the U.S. should have an honor for gallantry and risk-of-life in addition – and secondary to – the Medal of Honor.  He proposed the idea to President Woodrow Wilson, and the Distinguished Service Cross was authorized in 1918.  It was then awarded retroactively to 1917, and several even-older merit medals were upgraded.

Originally, the service cross was established to cover all people who acted on behalf of the U.S. military with extraordinary heroism in a combat situation.  But over time, the other military branches created their own service cross medals.  Today, second only to the Medal of Honor, there are now four service cross medals for the separate U.S. military branches: the Army’s Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross, the Air Force Cross, and the Coast Guard Cross.

 
Value:  47c
Issued: May 30, 2016
First Day City:  New York, NY
Type of Stamp:  First Class Mail
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Method:  Offset, Microprint
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  20,400,000
 

The Distinguished Service Cross issue recognizes the second-highest Army award for military valor in combat.  Richard Frasier's photograph of the medal was used by art director Greg Breeding to design the stamp.