#5209 – 2017 First-Class Forever Stamp - Have a Ball!: Tennis Ball

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U.S. #5209- Tennis Ball
2017 49c Have A Ball!
 
Ball games have been played around the world for thousands of years.  One of the first was called ōllamaliztli and was played by several pre-Columbian cultures including the Mayans and Aztecs. Like modern sporting events, ōllamaliztli matches were important social gatherings attended by people of many different backgrounds.

While other early ball games used leather balls, ancient Mesoamericans lived near rain forest and were able to make solid rubber balls from the Castilla elastica tree.  In ōllamaliztli, the ball (weighing up to nine pounds) was bumped with one’s hip with the goal of hitting it through a stone hoop 20 feet off the ground.  It was a dangerous sport that often resulted in both teams being covered in bruises from the heavy ball. 

Ōllamaliztli became extremely popular and archaeologists have found evidence of ball courts from modern-day Nicaragua all the way to the state of Arizona.  While the official rules of the original game are lost to history, it made its mark on Central American culture.  Some native populations still play a modified version of ōllamaliztli today. 

Modern U.S. sporting events have many similarities to those held by the Aztecs and Mayans thousands of years ago.  People bet on their favorite teams, have parties with friends, and share victory celebrations with complete strangers.  Sports bring people together to share in the thrill of victory and celebration of America’s athletic prowess.  They are more than just games, they are important parts of our culture.

The USPS issued the Have A Ball! stamps on June 14th 2017. The pane of 16 featuring eight different designs presents a special coating applied only to selected areas.  This gives the stamps a textured feel. Mike Ryan was the designer while Greg Breeding served as the art director for these beautiful textured stamps.

Birth of Althea Gibson

2013 Black Heritage: Althea Gibson stamp
US #4803 – Gibson was the 36th honoree in the Black Heritage Series.

Althea Neale Gibson was born on August 25, 1927, in Silver, South Carolina.  Gibson made history by becoming the first African American to win a Wimbledon title.  She’s been called the “female Jackie Robinson” for her role in breaking the color barrier in professional tennis.

Gibson’s parents were sharecroppers who struggled along with many other rural southern farmers when the Great Depression hit.  Therefore, in 1930, they moved to Harlem, New York.  Unhappy in school and often absent, Gibson first explored tennis by bouncing rubber balls off a brick wall until a one-armed coach taught her how to play.  By the time she was 12, Gibson was the city’s women’s paddle tennis champion.  Her neighbors then raised money to fund a junior membership at the Cosmopolitan Tennis Club.

2013 Imperforate Althea Gibson stamp
US #4803a – Imperforate Althea Gibson stamp

In 1941, Gibson won her first tournament – the American Tennis Association (ATA) New York State Championship.  She then won to national ATA championships in 1944 and 1945 and in 1947, won the first of ten straight women’s ATA titles.  Gibson moved Wilmington, North Carolina to finish high school and then went to Florida A&M University on an athletic scholarship.

Despite Gibson’s talent and great success, she was barred from competing in her sport’s top events due to her race.  While the US National Championships (US Open) prohibited segregation, most of the qualifying tournaments were held at white-only clubs.  Then in 1950, fellow tennis star Alice Marble wrote an open letter to protest this, and Gibson was permitted to compete in the US Open.  She was the first African American player to be invited to the nationals.  Though she lost in the second round, she received significant national attention.

2013 Althea Gibson Fleetwood First Day Cover with Digital Color Postmark.
US #4803 – Fleetwood First Day Cover with Digital Color Postmark

The following year, Gibson won her first international title, the Caribbean Championships in Jamaica.  That same year she became one of the first African-American competitors at Wimbledon, the oldest and often considered the most prestigious of all tennis championships.  In 1955, she won 16 of 18 international tournaments against some of the world’s best tennis stars.

2013 Althea Gibson Colorano Silk Cachet Combination First Day Cover.
US #4803 – Colorano Silk Cachet Combination First Day Cover

In 1956, Gibson became an international star after winning the singles title at the French Open, making her the first African American to do so.  The following year, on July 6, 1957, Gibson won the Tennis Championships at Wimbledon.  She was again the first African American to achieve that high honor.  1957 was a good year for Gibson – she went on to win the US Open and was selected by the Associated Press as Female Athlete of the Year.  She was the also the first African-American woman to appear on the covers of Sports Illustrated and Time magazines.

By 1958, Gibson had won 56 national and international tennis titles.  However, amateur tennis offered no prize money and athletes weren’t allowed to make endorsement deals.  A talented singer and saxophonist, Gibson recorded an album and appeared in a movie.  She also played exhibition matches before Harlem Globetrotters games and won the Pepsi Cola World Pro Tennis Championships.

1995 32¢ Recreational Sports: Tennis stamp
US #2964 – Gibson won 11 Grand Slam tournaments during her career.

Gibson became the first African-American woman to join the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) in 1964.  She still faced discrimination, but performed well, breaking course records and tying for second at the 1970 Len Immke Buick Open.  She left that sport in 1978.  Gibson worked with the national mobile tennis project, bringing tennis equipment to under privileged areas.  She also ran tennis outreach programs and coached several rising tennis stars.

2017 Have a Ball!: Tennis Ball stamp
US #5209 – Gibson has been called “one of the greatest players who ever lived.”

Gibson briefly served as New Jersey’s athletic commissioner and later served on the State Athletic Control Board and supervised the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.  She suffered from health issues in her later years and her former doubles partner raised awareness and money to help cover her medical expenses.  Gibson died on September 28, 2003.

Gibson was one of the first inductees into the International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame.  A tournament has been named after her as well as a few sports complexes.

  
Value:  49c
Issued: June 14, 2017
First Day City:  Hartford, WI
Type of Stamp:  First Class
Printed by:
  Ashton Potter Ltd.
Method:
  Offset
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  80,000,000
Read More - Click Here


U.S. #5209- Tennis Ball
2017 49c Have A Ball!

 
Ball games have been played around the world for thousands of years.  One of the first was called ōllamaliztli and was played by several pre-Columbian cultures including the Mayans and Aztecs. Like modern sporting events, ōllamaliztli matches were important social gatherings attended by people of many different backgrounds.

While other early ball games used leather balls, ancient Mesoamericans lived near rain forest and were able to make solid rubber balls from the Castilla elastica tree.  In ōllamaliztli, the ball (weighing up to nine pounds) was bumped with one’s hip with the goal of hitting it through a stone hoop 20 feet off the ground.  It was a dangerous sport that often resulted in both teams being covered in bruises from the heavy ball. 

Ōllamaliztli became extremely popular and archaeologists have found evidence of ball courts from modern-day Nicaragua all the way to the state of Arizona.  While the official rules of the original game are lost to history, it made its mark on Central American culture.  Some native populations still play a modified version of ōllamaliztli today. 

Modern U.S. sporting events have many similarities to those held by the Aztecs and Mayans thousands of years ago.  People bet on their favorite teams, have parties with friends, and share victory celebrations with complete strangers.  Sports bring people together to share in the thrill of victory and celebration of America’s athletic prowess.  They are more than just games, they are important parts of our culture.

The USPS issued the Have A Ball! stamps on June 14th 2017. The pane of 16 featuring eight different designs presents a special coating applied only to selected areas.  This gives the stamps a textured feel. Mike Ryan was the designer while Greg Breeding served as the art director for these beautiful textured stamps.

Birth of Althea Gibson

2013 Black Heritage: Althea Gibson stamp
US #4803 – Gibson was the 36th honoree in the Black Heritage Series.

Althea Neale Gibson was born on August 25, 1927, in Silver, South Carolina.  Gibson made history by becoming the first African American to win a Wimbledon title.  She’s been called the “female Jackie Robinson” for her role in breaking the color barrier in professional tennis.

Gibson’s parents were sharecroppers who struggled along with many other rural southern farmers when the Great Depression hit.  Therefore, in 1930, they moved to Harlem, New York.  Unhappy in school and often absent, Gibson first explored tennis by bouncing rubber balls off a brick wall until a one-armed coach taught her how to play.  By the time she was 12, Gibson was the city’s women’s paddle tennis champion.  Her neighbors then raised money to fund a junior membership at the Cosmopolitan Tennis Club.

2013 Imperforate Althea Gibson stamp
US #4803a – Imperforate Althea Gibson stamp

In 1941, Gibson won her first tournament – the American Tennis Association (ATA) New York State Championship.  She then won to national ATA championships in 1944 and 1945 and in 1947, won the first of ten straight women’s ATA titles.  Gibson moved Wilmington, North Carolina to finish high school and then went to Florida A&M University on an athletic scholarship.

Despite Gibson’s talent and great success, she was barred from competing in her sport’s top events due to her race.  While the US National Championships (US Open) prohibited segregation, most of the qualifying tournaments were held at white-only clubs.  Then in 1950, fellow tennis star Alice Marble wrote an open letter to protest this, and Gibson was permitted to compete in the US Open.  She was the first African American player to be invited to the nationals.  Though she lost in the second round, she received significant national attention.

2013 Althea Gibson Fleetwood First Day Cover with Digital Color Postmark.
US #4803 – Fleetwood First Day Cover with Digital Color Postmark

The following year, Gibson won her first international title, the Caribbean Championships in Jamaica.  That same year she became one of the first African-American competitors at Wimbledon, the oldest and often considered the most prestigious of all tennis championships.  In 1955, she won 16 of 18 international tournaments against some of the world’s best tennis stars.

2013 Althea Gibson Colorano Silk Cachet Combination First Day Cover.
US #4803 – Colorano Silk Cachet Combination First Day Cover

In 1956, Gibson became an international star after winning the singles title at the French Open, making her the first African American to do so.  The following year, on July 6, 1957, Gibson won the Tennis Championships at Wimbledon.  She was again the first African American to achieve that high honor.  1957 was a good year for Gibson – she went on to win the US Open and was selected by the Associated Press as Female Athlete of the Year.  She was the also the first African-American woman to appear on the covers of Sports Illustrated and Time magazines.

By 1958, Gibson had won 56 national and international tennis titles.  However, amateur tennis offered no prize money and athletes weren’t allowed to make endorsement deals.  A talented singer and saxophonist, Gibson recorded an album and appeared in a movie.  She also played exhibition matches before Harlem Globetrotters games and won the Pepsi Cola World Pro Tennis Championships.

1995 32¢ Recreational Sports: Tennis stamp
US #2964 – Gibson won 11 Grand Slam tournaments during her career.

Gibson became the first African-American woman to join the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) in 1964.  She still faced discrimination, but performed well, breaking course records and tying for second at the 1970 Len Immke Buick Open.  She left that sport in 1978.  Gibson worked with the national mobile tennis project, bringing tennis equipment to under privileged areas.  She also ran tennis outreach programs and coached several rising tennis stars.

2017 Have a Ball!: Tennis Ball stamp
US #5209 – Gibson has been called “one of the greatest players who ever lived.”

Gibson briefly served as New Jersey’s athletic commissioner and later served on the State Athletic Control Board and supervised the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.  She suffered from health issues in her later years and her former doubles partner raised awareness and money to help cover her medical expenses.  Gibson died on September 28, 2003.

Gibson was one of the first inductees into the International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame.  A tournament has been named after her as well as a few sports complexes.

  
Value:  49c
Issued: June 14, 2017
First Day City:  Hartford, WI
Type of Stamp:  First Class
Printed by:
  Ashton Potter Ltd.
Method:
  Offset
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  80,000,000