#5243 – 2017 First-Class Forever Stamp - "The Snowy Day": Peter Making a Snowball

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US #5243 - Peter Making a Snowball

2017 49c "The Snowy Day" 

 

Value:  49¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate- Forever

Issued:  October 4, 2017

First Day City:  Brooklyn, NY

Type of Stamp:  Special

Printed by:  Ashton Potter

Method:  Offset 

Format:  Double Sided Booklet of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  5,000,000 stamps

 

In The Snowy Day, Peter longs to play in a snowball fight with older kids.  Though, he quickly realized he is too young when a stray snowball knocks him off his feet.  Snowball fights have been around since before the 15th century, as demonstrated in Boemo Venceslao’s painting Cycle of the Twelve Months.

During the American Civil War, there was an incredible break out of snowball fun.  On January 29, 1863, two feet of snow fell in Rappahannock Valley, Virginia.  The snowball fight started when First and Fourth Texas Infantries “attacked” the Fifth Infantry.  Then, all of those men crept up to the Third Arkansas Infantry and fought with them.  Then they all went after the Georgia Brigade and so on.  In the end, the snowball fight included 9,000 soldiers!  Shortly after, General James Longstreet forbid all snowball fights.   

Besides the Civil War scuffle, the largest snowball fight occurred on January 31, 2016.  A total of 7,681 people gathered in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, as a sendoff to the Yukigassen – a professional snowball competition.  The Yukigassen comes from Japan – “Yuki” meaning snow and “Kassen” meaning battle.  Two teams face off in a battle similar to capture the flag, each with 90 snowballs made in advance. 

Snowball fighting is irresistible with the right snow and obviously isn’t limited to adolescents alone.

 

Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the stamps with Ezra Jack Keats' original art.

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US #5243 - Peter Making a Snowball

2017 49c "The Snowy Day" 

 

Value:  49¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate- Forever

Issued:  October 4, 2017

First Day City:  Brooklyn, NY

Type of Stamp:  Special

Printed by:  Ashton Potter

Method:  Offset 

Format:  Double Sided Booklet of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  5,000,000 stamps

 

In The Snowy Day, Peter longs to play in a snowball fight with older kids.  Though, he quickly realized he is too young when a stray snowball knocks him off his feet.  Snowball fights have been around since before the 15th century, as demonstrated in Boemo Venceslao’s painting Cycle of the Twelve Months.

During the American Civil War, there was an incredible break out of snowball fun.  On January 29, 1863, two feet of snow fell in Rappahannock Valley, Virginia.  The snowball fight started when First and Fourth Texas Infantries “attacked” the Fifth Infantry.  Then, all of those men crept up to the Third Arkansas Infantry and fought with them.  Then they all went after the Georgia Brigade and so on.  In the end, the snowball fight included 9,000 soldiers!  Shortly after, General James Longstreet forbid all snowball fights.   

Besides the Civil War scuffle, the largest snowball fight occurred on January 31, 2016.  A total of 7,681 people gathered in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, as a sendoff to the Yukigassen – a professional snowball competition.  The Yukigassen comes from Japan – “Yuki” meaning snow and “Kassen” meaning battle.  Two teams face off in a battle similar to capture the flag, each with 90 snowballs made in advance. 

Snowball fighting is irresistible with the right snow and obviously isn’t limited to adolescents alone.

 

Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the stamps with Ezra Jack Keats' original art.