#5280 – 2018 50c Peace Rose

Condition
Price
Qty
- First Day Cover with Digital Color Postmark
Ships in 1 business day. i
$6.95
- Fleetwood First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
Grading Guide

  

#5280

2018 50c Peace Rose

 

Value:  50¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate- Forever

Issued:  April 21, 2018

First Day City:  Shreveport, LA

Type of Stamp: Definitive

Printed by:  Ashton Potter

Method:  Offset 

Format:  Booklet of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed: 40,000,000 stamps

 

Smuggled out of France just before the Nazi invasion, a new variety of rose emerged during World War II.  Resilient and long-lasting, the aptly named Peace rose would go on to bring color and joy to the gardens of millions recovering from the war.

 

The Peace rose was developed between 1935 and 1939 by French horticulturist Francis Meilland. In anticipation of the German invasion of France, he sought to protect his beloved flower.  Meilland sent cuttings to friends in Italy, Turkey, Germany, and the United States.  Reportedly, the cuttings sent to America were on the last plane to leave France before the Nazi’s arrival.

 

Meilland’s friends received their cuttings, grew the roses in a variety of climates, and found they were hardy, vigorous, and disease resistant.  The rose was then made available to the US public on April 29, 1945, the day Berlin fell and a truce was declared.  In a special ceremony, two doves were released and the rose was named for the “world’s greatest desire: peace.”  The Peace rose helped popularize gardening and eventually became one of the world’s most beloved roses. 

 

At the first meeting of the United Nations in 1945, each of the delegates was presented a Peace rose in the hopes it would “influence men’s thoughts for everlasting world peace.”

Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

  

#5280

2018 50c Peace Rose

 

Value:  50¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate- Forever

Issued:  April 21, 2018

First Day City:  Shreveport, LA

Type of Stamp: Definitive

Printed by:  Ashton Potter

Method:  Offset 

Format:  Booklet of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed: 40,000,000 stamps

 

Smuggled out of France just before the Nazi invasion, a new variety of rose emerged during World War II.  Resilient and long-lasting, the aptly named Peace rose would go on to bring color and joy to the gardens of millions recovering from the war.

 

The Peace rose was developed between 1935 and 1939 by French horticulturist Francis Meilland. In anticipation of the German invasion of France, he sought to protect his beloved flower.  Meilland sent cuttings to friends in Italy, Turkey, Germany, and the United States.  Reportedly, the cuttings sent to America were on the last plane to leave France before the Nazi’s arrival.

 

Meilland’s friends received their cuttings, grew the roses in a variety of climates, and found they were hardy, vigorous, and disease resistant.  The rose was then made available to the US public on April 29, 1945, the day Berlin fell and a truce was declared.  In a special ceremony, two doves were released and the rose was named for the “world’s greatest desire: peace.”  The Peace rose helped popularize gardening and eventually became one of the world’s most beloved roses. 

 

At the first meeting of the United Nations in 1945, each of the delegates was presented a Peace rose in the hopes it would “influence men’s thoughts for everlasting world peace.”