#5360 – 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - Statehood: Alabama Bicentennial

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U.S. #5360

2019 55¢ Alabama – Statehood Series

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  February 23, 2019
First Day City:  Huntsville, AL
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Pane of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  25,000,000
 
Alabama has a rich and varied history that makes it stand out among the other states.  It was not part of the original 13 colonies, and stook until December 14, 1819, to become a state.  Until achieving statehood, it was occupied by several different countries over many years. Before Europeans first arrived in America, Alabama was inhabited by Native Americans who called themselves Albaamo.  When the Spanish arrived in 1540, they misunderstood the name as Alibamo or Alibamu.  The French occupied the territory starting around 1702, and also took up this name, calling the nearby river Rivière des Alibamons.  It is easy to see how the British came to calle the territory "Alabama." Historians agree on the origin of "Alabama," but still debate the true meaning of the word.  Some say it came from the Choctaw words alba and amo, meaning "herb gatherers," as the local Native Americans were known for their use of medicinal plants.  In 1842, the Jacksonville Republican declared "Alabama" to mean "Here We Rest."  This proved popular with the public, but was unsupported by language experts. Whether these definitions are true or not, they are a fun part of Alabama's history.  They helped shape the state into the thriving community of diverse cultures it is today.
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U.S. #5360

2019 55¢ Alabama – Statehood Series

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  February 23, 2019
First Day City:  Huntsville, AL
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Pane of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  25,000,000
 

Alabama has a rich and varied history that makes it stand out among the other states.  It was not part of the original 13 colonies, and stook until December 14, 1819, to become a state.  Until achieving statehood, it was occupied by several different countries over many years.

Before Europeans first arrived in America, Alabama was inhabited by Native Americans who called themselves Albaamo.  When the Spanish arrived in 1540, they misunderstood the name as Alibamo or Alibamu.  The French occupied the territory starting around 1702, and also took up this name, calling the nearby river Rivière des Alibamons.  It is easy to see how the British came to calle the territory "Alabama."

Historians agree on the origin of "Alabama," but still debate the true meaning of the word.  Some say it came from the Choctaw words alba and amo, meaning "herb gatherers," as the local Native Americans were known for their use of medicinal plants.  In 1842, the Jacksonville Republican declared "Alabama" to mean "Here We Rest."  This proved popular with the public, but was unsupported by language experts.

Whether these definitions are true or not, they are a fun part of Alabama's history.  They helped shape the state into the thriving community of diverse cultures it is today.