#5396 – 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - Frogs: Northern Leopard Frog

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.25
$1.25
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.85
$0.85
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM638215x33mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM608239x33mm 5 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$1.00
$1.00

U.S. #5396

2019 55¢ Frogs – Northern Leopard Frog

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  June 22, 2019
First Day City:  Detroit, MI
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 16
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  62,000,000
 
The northern leopard frog comes from the family of ranidae, which is the "true frog family."  This frog is a hardy breed and has become the state amphibian of Minnesota and Vermont. The northern leopard frog is a medium-sized frog, measuring around 2-5 inches long.  It is green or brown with dark spots and can leap 5-6 feet in a zigzag pattern.  Since this frog doesn't secrete anything through it's skin, its color and ability to jump help it to escape predators. This frog can also slow its heartbeat, which helps it survive winter when it hibernates on the bottom of ponds.  In spring, it emerges as if it never slowed down.  After the northern leopard frog mates, in March-June, it leaves the water and spends the summer in grassy areas.  It has a large mouth and eats the typical small insects, but has also been known to eat birds, gartern snakes, and even bats. The northern leopard frog produces an enzyme in its oocyte (egg cell) that has been found to attack cancer cells.  This enzyme, called amphinase, can be extracted from the eggs and also can easily be made synthetically.  Researchers are optimistic the enzyme will be an alternative to invasive operation, radiation, or chemotherapy.  The northern leopard frog might just be the hero that makes cancer a non-life-threatening disease.
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 10 new Forever stamps picturing winter scenes.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $8.50- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1980s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1980s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the 1980 Winter Olympics, paid tribute to the service of American veterans,  and recalled some of the United States’ most well-known first ladies (like Abigail Adams and Eleanor Roosevelt).  There was even a cover issued for the World Stamp Expo of 1989.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • U.S. Used Stamp Collection - 157 stamps U.S. Used Collection of 157 stamps

    You'll receive postally used stamps issued from 1890 to 2010 – that's 120 years of history to explore!  This collection includes definitive, commemorative, and Airmail stamps, plus a few other surprises.  You'll have a great time exploring the stamps and adding them to your collection.  Order today.

    $4.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #5396

2019 55¢ Frogs – Northern Leopard Frog

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  June 22, 2019
First Day City:  Detroit, MI
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 16
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  62,000,000
 

The northern leopard frog comes from the family of ranidae, which is the "true frog family."  This frog is a hardy breed and has become the state amphibian of Minnesota and Vermont.

The northern leopard frog is a medium-sized frog, measuring around 2-5 inches long.  It is green or brown with dark spots and can leap 5-6 feet in a zigzag pattern.  Since this frog doesn't secrete anything through it's skin, its color and ability to jump help it to escape predators.

This frog can also slow its heartbeat, which helps it survive winter when it hibernates on the bottom of ponds.  In spring, it emerges as if it never slowed down.  After the northern leopard frog mates, in March-June, it leaves the water and spends the summer in grassy areas.  It has a large mouth and eats the typical small insects, but has also been known to eat birds, gartern snakes, and even bats.

The northern leopard frog produces an enzyme in its oocyte (egg cell) that has been found to attack cancer cells.  This enzyme, called amphinase, can be extracted from the eggs and also can easily be made synthetically.  Researchers are optimistic the enzyme will be an alternative to invasive operation, radiation, or chemotherapy.  The northern leopard frog might just be the hero that makes cancer a non-life-threatening disease.