#5400 – 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - First Moon Landing: The Moon

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U.S. #5400

2019 55¢ Moon Landing:  The Moon

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  July 19, 2019
First Day City:  Canaveral, FL
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 24
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  60,000,000
 
Neil Armstrong made history when he stepped out onto the Moon's surface on July 21, 1969.  Joined shortly after by Buzz Aldrin, the astronauts had several tasks to carry out in the little over two hours they had on the Moon's surface. One of the Apollo 11 crew's primary tasks was collecting soil and rock samples.  In all, they collected about 50 pounds of rocks and 13 pounds of soil.  Upon returning the rocks to Earth, it was discovered that they had found three new minerals, one of which was named after the three Apollo 11 astronauts (Armalcolite). Armstrong and Aldrin then positioned a device to measure the contents of the solar wind that blew across the Moon.  They also set up equipment to reflect laser beams from Earth, to help determine the exact distance between the Earth and the Moon.  Finally, they placed a passive seismometer to measure moonquakes and meteor crashes.  The most challenging of their tasts was planting the flag, because of the hard rock surface. While Armstrong and Aldrin carried out their tasks, Michael Collins orbited the Moon.  He performed maintenance work and prepared for their return.  They were reunited on July 21 and splashed down in teh Pacific on July 24.  Upon their return, President Nixon greeted them, saying, "As a result of what you've done, the world has never been closer together before."  
Get a Neat First Day Combination Cover!
 
This First Day combination cover captures decades of important American space history!  Incudes the very first US space stamp issued in 1948 for Fort Bliss (tiny rocket in stamp design), 1960 Echo Satellite, 1962 Project Mercury, 1967 “Space Twins” spacewalk, to the 2019 Moon Landing stamps.  Get it in your collection today!
 
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U.S. #5400

2019 55¢ Moon Landing:  The Moon

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  July 19, 2019
First Day City:  Canaveral, FL
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 24
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  60,000,000
 

Neil Armstrong made history when he stepped out onto the Moon's surface on July 21, 1969.  Joined shortly after by Buzz Aldrin, the astronauts had several tasks to carry out in the little over two hours they had on the Moon's surface.

One of the Apollo 11 crew's primary tasks was collecting soil and rock samples.  In all, they collected about 50 pounds of rocks and 13 pounds of soil.  Upon returning the rocks to Earth, it was discovered that they had found three new minerals, one of which was named after the three Apollo 11 astronauts (Armalcolite).

Armstrong and Aldrin then positioned a device to measure the contents of the solar wind that blew across the Moon.  They also set up equipment to reflect laser beams from Earth, to help determine the exact distance between the Earth and the Moon.  Finally, they placed a passive seismometer to measure moonquakes and meteor crashes.  The most challenging of their tasts was planting the flag, because of the hard rock surface.

While Armstrong and Aldrin carried out their tasks, Michael Collins orbited the Moon.  He performed maintenance work and prepared for their return.  They were reunited on July 21 and splashed down in teh Pacific on July 24.  Upon their return, President Nixon greeted them, saying, "As a result of what you've done, the world has never been closer together before."

 

Get a Neat First Day Combination Cover!
 
This First Day combination cover captures decades of important American space history!  Incudes the very first US space stamp issued in 1948 for Fort Bliss (tiny rocket in stamp design), 1960 Echo Satellite, 1962 Project Mercury, 1967 “Space Twins” spacewalk, to the 2019 Moon Landing stamps.  Get it in your collection today!