#5411 – 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - Adult T. Rex in Clearing

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U.S. #5411

2019 55¢ Tyrannosaurus Rex – Adult

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  August 29, 2019
First Day City:  Washington, DC
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Flexo, Lenticular
Format:  Pane of 16
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  50,000,000
 
The first Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever found was discovered by Barnum Brown (renowned paleontologist and assistant curator at the American Museum of Natural History) in 1900 Wyoming.  Brown found a second specimen in Montana two years later.  This began decades of fossil digs resulting in over 50 T. rex skeletons being excavated. The largest and most well-preserved T. rex found as of 2019 was "Sue."  The fossil was found August 12, 1990, in the Hell Creek Formation in South Dakota and named after its discoverer, Susan Hendrickson.  There was some controversy over the skeleton as it was found on Indian Reservation land owned by Maurice Williams.  Williams was paid $5,000 for the bones, but in 1992, still claimed he owned the T. rex.  The case went to court, and, in the end, Sue was awarded to Williams.  He then sold the fossil for $8.4 million to the Chicago Field Museum of Natural History. Sue is one of the most complete T. rex fossils ever found (90% of the bones were recovered).  It measures 40 feet long, 12 feet tall, and weighed around 30,800 pounds when it was alive.  At 28 years old at time of death, Sue is the third-oldest T. rex specimen found.  It's fun to imagine the life Sue must have led.  At such a size, it would have been the ruler of the land.  No one could have hoped to challenge such an impressive beast.
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U.S. #5411

2019 55¢ Tyrannosaurus Rex – Adult

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  August 29, 2019
First Day City:  Washington, DC
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Flexo, Lenticular
Format:  Pane of 16
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  50,000,000
 

The first Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever found was discovered by Barnum Brown (renowned paleontologist and assistant curator at the American Museum of Natural History) in 1900 Wyoming.  Brown found a second specimen in Montana two years later.  This began decades of fossil digs resulting in over 50 T. rex skeletons being excavated.

The largest and most well-preserved T. rex found as of 2019 was "Sue."  The fossil was found August 12, 1990, in the Hell Creek Formation in South Dakota and named after its discoverer, Susan Hendrickson.  There was some controversy over the skeleton as it was found on Indian Reservation land owned by Maurice Williams.  Williams was paid $5,000 for the bones, but in 1992, still claimed he owned the T. rex.  The case went to court, and, in the end, Sue was awarded to Williams.  He then sold the fossil for $8.4 million to the Chicago Field Museum of Natural History.

Sue is one of the most complete T. rex fossils ever found (90% of the bones were recovered).  It measures 40 feet long, 12 feet tall, and weighed around 30,800 pounds when it was alive.  At 28 years old at time of death, Sue is the third-oldest T. rex specimen found.  It's fun to imagine the life Sue must have led.  At such a size, it would have been the ruler of the land.  No one could have hoped to challenge such an impressive beast.