#5418 – 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - Winter Berries: Soapberry

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$2.25
$2.25
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.40
$0.40
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM639215x35mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM77032x34mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.95
$3.95

U.S. #5418

2019 55¢ Winter Berries:  Soapberry

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  September 17, 2019
First Day City:  Tulsa, OK
Type of Stamp:  Definitive
Printed by:  Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Double-sided Booklet of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  300,000,000
 
Today, most soap is produced in big factories and can contain chemicals that are bad for skin and hair.  For this reason, some people choose to make their own soap using traditional methods.  One of these methods involves the use of soapberries. The soapberry (Sapindus saponaria) is a large, leathery, golden-colored fruit with a single black seed in the center.  The berries begin to ripen in October, but can still be found on trees well into the winter.  Soapberry trees can reach heights anywhere from 20 to 50 feet tall. Soapberry trees are found mainly in warm tropical regions, where people native to these areas know the best way to make soap from the berries:  "Dry the fruits until they can't be dried anymore, than [put the fruits] on stone metate grinds and grind until [you have] pure dust."  This powder can then be used in any way regular soap is used.  In the United States, soapberry trees can be found growing from Arizona east to Kansas, Texas, and Florida.  The trees can flourish in a variety of environments as long as they have moist soil. Researchers have begun looking into the potential benefits of soapberries over mass-produced soap.  Some positives might include less drying of skin and hair, natural antimicrobial properties, and more.  It's exciting to think what other benefits might be discovered!
Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty 2021 First Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty

    In 2021, the United States Postal Service anticipated the arrival of spring with a new set of 10 Forever stamps honoring Garden Beauty.  Order yours today!

    $10.95- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels  May Include Targets, Stars, Numbers, or Grids. Set of 5 with small imperfections Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels
    Since they first appeared in the 19th century, fancy cancels have been extremely sought-after by collectors.  Act now to add five of these to your collection.  Stamps may vary, but that's half the fun!
    $12.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the American flag, Alexander Hamilton, Religious Freedom, Overland Mail, NATO, and more.  This money saving offer saves you over $90!  Order your set today.
    $89.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #5418

2019 55¢ Winter Berries:  Soapberry

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  September 17, 2019
First Day City:  Tulsa, OK
Type of Stamp:  Definitive
Printed by:  Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Double-sided Booklet of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  300,000,000
 

Today, most soap is produced in big factories and can contain chemicals that are bad for skin and hair.  For this reason, some people choose to make their own soap using traditional methods.  One of these methods involves the use of soapberries.

The soapberry (Sapindus saponaria) is a large, leathery, golden-colored fruit with a single black seed in the center.  The berries begin to ripen in October, but can still be found on trees well into the winter.  Soapberry trees can reach heights anywhere from 20 to 50 feet tall.

Soapberry trees are found mainly in warm tropical regions, where people native to these areas know the best way to make soap from the berries:  "Dry the fruits until they can't be dried anymore, than [put the fruits] on stone metate grinds and grind until [you have] pure dust."  This powder can then be used in any way regular soap is used.  In the United States, soapberry trees can be found growing from Arizona east to Kansas, Texas, and Florida.  The trees can flourish in a variety of environments as long as they have moist soil.

Researchers have begun looking into the potential benefits of soapberries over mass-produced soap.  Some positives might include less drying of skin and hair, natural antimicrobial properties, and more.  It's exciting to think what other benefits might be discovered!