#5441 – 2020 First-Class Forever Stamp - Wild Orchids (coil): Hexalectris spicata

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.10
$1.10
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.85
$0.85
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM639215x35mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM77032x34mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.95
$3.95
     U.S. #5441

2020 55¢ Hexalectris Spicata (Crested Coralroot Orchid)

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  February 21, 2020
First Day City:  Coral Gables, FL
Type of Stamp:  Definitive
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Coil of 3,000 OR Coil of 10,000
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  15,000,000 OR 50,000,000
 
Orchid species commonly bought in a store are known for large, colorful flowers that are impossible to miss.  Wild orchids, on the other hand, can be relatively small and easily overlooked by inexperienced gardeners.

One unusual wild orchid native to the United States is Hexalectris spicate – the “crested coralroot” orchid.  The orchid earned its name from the Greek Hexalectris, meaning “six rooster,” in reference to the six raised ridges on the lower flower petal.  Spicate indicates that the flowers grow from a spike.  The “coralroot” part of this orchid’s common name refers to the plant’s twisted thick, stem-like root system.

The crested coralroot orchid has no leaves and is unable to produce chlorophyll to feed itself.  Instead, it relies on a special relationship with certain fungi to survive.  This is called mycorrhiza and consists of the fungi attaching to the orchid’s roots to provide it with water and other essential nutrients.  Without the fungi, the orchid would eventually wither and die.

The crested coralroot orchid usually grows in tall grass or leaf litter, so even when it flowers, it can blend in with its surroundings from a distance.  However, when viewed up close, the plant’s purple- and magenta-striped flowers become visible and reveal the plant’s striking hidden beauty.


 
Read More - Click Here


  • Mini Mix, approximately 500 Stamps Mini Mix, 500 Worldwide Stamps

    Get an instant stamp collection in one simple step.  Order Mystic's mini-mix and you'll get 500-plus U.S. and foreign stamps on and off paper.

    $19.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used 1887-98 Regular Issue, 12 Used Stamps
    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 100 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today!
    $30.95
    BUY NOW
  • German Zeppelin Facsimiles, 8v Mint German Zeppelin Facsimiles
    The original set of these overprinted German Graf Zeppelin stamps is very valuable. These high-quality facsimiles offered here were created in Germany and will allow you to affordably fill the spaces for these stamps in your worldwide album and enjoy their classic designs.
    $9.95
    BUY NOW

     U.S. #5441

2020 55¢ Hexalectris Spicata (Crested Coralroot Orchid)

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  February 21, 2020
First Day City:  Coral Gables, FL
Type of Stamp:  Definitive
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Coil of 3,000 OR Coil of 10,000
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  15,000,000 OR 50,000,000
 

Orchid species commonly bought in a store are known for large, colorful flowers that are impossible to miss.  Wild orchids, on the other hand, can be relatively small and easily overlooked by inexperienced gardeners.

One unusual wild orchid native to the United States is Hexalectris spicate – the “crested coralroot” orchid.  The orchid earned its name from the Greek Hexalectris, meaning “six rooster,” in reference to the six raised ridges on the lower flower petal.  Spicate indicates that the flowers grow from a spike.  The “coralroot” part of this orchid’s common name refers to the plant’s twisted thick, stem-like root system.

The crested coralroot orchid has no leaves and is unable to produce chlorophyll to feed itself.  Instead, it relies on a special relationship with certain fungi to survive.  This is called mycorrhiza and consists of the fungi attaching to the orchid’s roots to provide it with water and other essential nutrients.  Without the fungi, the orchid would eventually wither and die.

The crested coralroot orchid usually grows in tall grass or leaf litter, so even when it flowers, it can blend in with its surroundings from a distance.  However, when viewed up close, the plant’s purple- and magenta-striped flowers become visible and reveal the plant’s striking hidden beauty.