#575 – 1923 1c Franklin, imperforate green

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$14.00
$14.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$9.00
$9.00
- Unused Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$8.00FREE with 2,220 points!
$8.00
- Used Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$5.50FREE with 1,360 points!
$5.50
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Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50327x30mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
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$3.50
$3.50
- MM420027x30mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
U.S. #575
Series of 1923-25 1¢ Ben Franklin

Issue Date: March 16, 1923
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 16,072,400
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat Plate
Perforation: None
Color: Green
 
Private Companies Purchased Imperforates for Vending Machines
Like the Washington-Franklin imperforates, the imperforate stamps of 1923-25 were issued for private companies to use in their vending machines. Since the machines required special perforations, the companies bought the imperforate stamps and applied their own perforations.
 
U.S. #575 was mostly used in Chicago by private companies for mass-mailings. By April 1925, the third class circular rate rose to 1 ½¢, which ended the main need for this stamp. It was also used in New York until the Postage Meter Company purchased the Mail-o-Meter Company. After that, private perforation of U.S. #575 occurred only in Chicago.
 
Although issued in great quantities, there were some attempts at manipulating the market value of US. #575. As the third class increase approached, some stamp dealers set aside large numbers of the stamp, which drove prices up for a time.
 
 
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U.S. #575
Series of 1923-25 1¢ Ben Franklin

Issue Date: March 16, 1923
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 16,072,400
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat Plate
Perforation: None
Color: Green
 
Private Companies Purchased Imperforates for Vending Machines
Like the Washington-Franklin imperforates, the imperforate stamps of 1923-25 were issued for private companies to use in their vending machines. Since the machines required special perforations, the companies bought the imperforate stamps and applied their own perforations.
 
U.S. #575 was mostly used in Chicago by private companies for mass-mailings. By April 1925, the third class circular rate rose to 1 ½¢, which ended the main need for this stamp. It was also used in New York until the Postage Meter Company purchased the Mail-o-Meter Company. After that, private perforation of U.S. #575 occurred only in Chicago.
 
Although issued in great quantities, there were some attempts at manipulating the market value of US. #575. As the third class increase approached, some stamp dealers set aside large numbers of the stamp, which drove prices up for a time.