#634A – 1928 2c Washington, carmine, type II

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U.S. #634A
Series of 1926-28 2¢ George Washington
Type II

Issue Date: December 1928
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: Unknown
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 11x10 ½
Color: Carmine
 
U.S. #634A was the result of a re-cut die plate for U.S. #634, which had been issued in 1926. As the original plate was used to print billions of stamps, the image began to wear down and the quality to decrease. The re-cut plates made a sharper, more defined stamp.
 
How to Identify the 2¢ Type II
 
The hair on Washington’s head has three heavy lines added. The scrollwork about the left “2” (called “acanthus”) is sharply defined from the outside border it overlaps. Rectangular box surrounding circle in bottom corners is more clearly defined.
 
General Henry Lee’s Eulogy
to George Washington
 
George Washington died at his beloved Mount Vernon home on December 14, 1799. Congress asked General Henry “Lighthorse Harry” Lee to deliver the eulogy. Sixteen cannons boomed at dawn on the morning of December 26, 1799, and volleys continued on the half hour throughout the day. A somber procession marched through Philadelphia, accompanied by a riderless horse escorted by two marines. General Henry Lee addressed a grieving audience that numbered more than 4,000. Of the fallen Commander in Chief, Lee said:
 
“First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen, he was second to none in the humble and endearing scenes of private life. Pious, just, humane, temperate and sincere – uniform, dignified and commanding – his example was as edifying to all around him as were the effects of that example lasting. Correct throughout, vice shuddered in his presence and virtue always felt his fostering hand. The purity of his private character gave effulgence to his public virtues. Such was the man for whom our nation mourns.”
 
 

 

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U.S. #634A
Series of 1926-28 2¢ George Washington
Type II

Issue Date: December 1928
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: Unknown
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 11x10 ½
Color: Carmine
 
U.S. #634A was the result of a re-cut die plate for U.S. #634, which had been issued in 1926. As the original plate was used to print billions of stamps, the image began to wear down and the quality to decrease. The re-cut plates made a sharper, more defined stamp.
 
How to Identify the 2¢ Type II
 
The hair on Washington’s head has three heavy lines added. The scrollwork about the left “2” (called “acanthus”) is sharply defined from the outside border it overlaps. Rectangular box surrounding circle in bottom corners is more clearly defined.
 
General Henry Lee’s Eulogy
to George Washington
 
George Washington died at his beloved Mount Vernon home on December 14, 1799. Congress asked General Henry “Lighthorse Harry” Lee to deliver the eulogy. Sixteen cannons boomed at dawn on the morning of December 26, 1799, and volleys continued on the half hour throughout the day. A somber procession marched through Philadelphia, accompanied by a riderless horse escorted by two marines. General Henry Lee addressed a grieving audience that numbered more than 4,000. Of the fallen Commander in Chief, Lee said:
 
“First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen, he was second to none in the humble and endearing scenes of private life. Pious, just, humane, temperate and sincere – uniform, dignified and commanding – his example was as edifying to all around him as were the effects of that example lasting. Correct throughout, vice shuddered in his presence and virtue always felt his fostering hand. The purity of his private character gave effulgence to his public virtues. Such was the man for whom our nation mourns.”