#703 – 1931 2c Yorktown Issue

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U.S. #703
1931 2¢ Yorktown Issue

Issue Date:
October 19, 1931
First City: Wethersfield, CT and Yorktown, VA
Quantity Issued: 25,006,400
 
In 1931, this 2¢ stamp was issued to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Yorktown.
 
The Battle of Yorktown
The Battle of Yorktown was the last major battle of the American Revolutionary War. At Yorktown, French and American forces worked together to crush the British army under General Charles Cornwallis. This stamp pictures General George Washington and his French allies, Lieutenant General Jean Rochambeau and Admiral François De Grasse.
 
In August 1781, Cornwallis’ troops were stationed in a defensive position along the Virginia coast. De Grasse’s fleet blocked the Chesapeake Bay, preventing Cornwallis from escaping by sea. At the same time, troops under Washington and Rochambeau trapped Cornwallis on land. On October 19, 1781, Cornwallis surrendered. More than 8,000 British troops laid down their arms – about one-quarter of the total British forces in America. Although the surrender at Yorktown did not end the war, it was a major milestone, destroying the British will to fight.
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U.S. #703
1931 2¢ Yorktown Issue

Issue Date:
October 19, 1931
First City: Wethersfield, CT and Yorktown, VA
Quantity Issued: 25,006,400
 
In 1931, this 2¢ stamp was issued to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Yorktown.
 
The Battle of Yorktown
The Battle of Yorktown was the last major battle of the American Revolutionary War. At Yorktown, French and American forces worked together to crush the British army under General Charles Cornwallis. This stamp pictures General George Washington and his French allies, Lieutenant General Jean Rochambeau and Admiral François De Grasse.
 
In August 1781, Cornwallis’ troops were stationed in a defensive position along the Virginia coast. De Grasse’s fleet blocked the Chesapeake Bay, preventing Cornwallis from escaping by sea. At the same time, troops under Washington and Rochambeau trapped Cornwallis on land. On October 19, 1781, Cornwallis surrendered. More than 8,000 British troops laid down their arms – about one-quarter of the total British forces in America. Although the surrender at Yorktown did not end the war, it was a major milestone, destroying the British will to fight.