#724 – 1932 3c William Penn

U.S. #724
1932 3¢ William Penn

Issue Date:
October 24, 1932
First City: New Castle, DE, Chester and Philadelphia, PA
Quantity Issued: 49,949,000
 
U.S. #724 was issued to commemorate Pennsylvania’s 250th anniversary. The stamp pictures William Penn, the founder of the “Keystone State.”
 
William Penn Founds Pennsylvania
William Penn (1644-1718) was born in London, England, the son of a prominent naval officer who was later knighted Admiral Sir William Penn. Penn became a member of a religious group whose members were known as “Quakers.” In England at that time, Quakers were persecuted for their beliefs.
 
In 1681, King Charles II granted the region that is now Pennsylvania to Penn to repay a debt to his father. Penn decided to call the region Sylvania, which means woods. King Charles II added Penn to the name in honor of Admiral Penn. Penn wanted Quakers, as well as members of other faiths, to enjoy religious freedom in Pennsylvania. In 1682, Penn arrived in the colony and enacted its first constitution, called the “Frame of Government.”
 
Pennsylvania prospered under Penn’s leadership. Penn died in 1718, and the colony remained under the control of the Penn family until it became a state on December 12, 1787. Pennsylvania was the second state to join the Union.

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U.S. #724
1932 3¢ William Penn

Issue Date:
October 24, 1932
First City: New Castle, DE, Chester and Philadelphia, PA
Quantity Issued: 49,949,000
 
U.S. #724 was issued to commemorate Pennsylvania’s 250th anniversary. The stamp pictures William Penn, the founder of the “Keystone State.”
 
William Penn Founds Pennsylvania
William Penn (1644-1718) was born in London, England, the son of a prominent naval officer who was later knighted Admiral Sir William Penn. Penn became a member of a religious group whose members were known as “Quakers.” In England at that time, Quakers were persecuted for their beliefs.
 
In 1681, King Charles II granted the region that is now Pennsylvania to Penn to repay a debt to his father. Penn decided to call the region Sylvania, which means woods. King Charles II added Penn to the name in honor of Admiral Penn. Penn wanted Quakers, as well as members of other faiths, to enjoy religious freedom in Pennsylvania. In 1682, Penn arrived in the colony and enacted its first constitution, called the “Frame of Government.”
 
Pennsylvania prospered under Penn’s leadership. Penn died in 1718, and the colony remained under the control of the Penn family until it became a state on December 12, 1787. Pennsylvania was the second state to join the Union.