#771 – 1935 16c Great Seal of United States

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$4.25
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 1,040 points!
$3.95
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.35
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.75
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63725 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 32 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM637 25 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 32 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM67150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 32 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$8.00
- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
U.S. #771
16¢ 1935 Design of U.S. No. CE1
Great Seal of the United States
Air Mail Special Delivery

Issue Date: March 15, 1935
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 1,370,560
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat Plate Press
Perforation: None
Color: Dark Blue
 
Designed by President Franklin Roosevelt, U.S. #771 is the exact design and color of Scott #CE1, and paid the extra fees on Airmail Special Delivery. The stamp was sold at the Philatelic Agency for only two months. The difference between U.S. #771 and the original “Folly” version (the stamps given as gifts to Roosevelt and others), is that the normally issued stamp is imperforate.
 
Farley’s Follies
U.S. #771 was the last of Farley’s Follies. Starting in 1933, Postmaster General James Farley had sheets of newly produced stamps removed before they were gummed and perforated. He gave them to stamp collector President Franklin Roosevelt and other high-ranking officials. Collectors protested – these were specifically made rarities that were not available to the public! On February 5, 1935, the problem was solved. All the stamps issued since March 4, 1933, were re-issued in imperforate, ungummed condition in such quantities as the public required.
Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #771
16¢ 1935 Design of U.S. No. CE1
Great Seal of the United States
Air Mail Special Delivery

Issue Date: March 15, 1935
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 1,370,560
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat Plate Press
Perforation: None
Color: Dark Blue
 
Designed by President Franklin Roosevelt, U.S. #771 is the exact design and color of Scott #CE1, and paid the extra fees on Airmail Special Delivery. The stamp was sold at the Philatelic Agency for only two months. The difference between U.S. #771 and the original “Folly” version (the stamps given as gifts to Roosevelt and others), is that the normally issued stamp is imperforate.
 
Farley’s Follies
U.S. #771 was the last of Farley’s Follies. Starting in 1933, Postmaster General James Farley had sheets of newly produced stamps removed before they were gummed and perforated. He gave them to stamp collector President Franklin Roosevelt and other high-ranking officials. Collectors protested – these were specifically made rarities that were not available to the public! On February 5, 1935, the problem was solved. All the stamps issued since March 4, 1933, were re-issued in imperforate, ungummed condition in such quantities as the public required.