#786 – 1937 2c Jackson and Scott - Hermitage

U.S. #786
1937 2¢ Jackson & Scott
Army and Navy

Issue Date:
January 15, 1937
First City: Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 93,848,500
 
After first achieving fame during the War of 1812, General Andrew Jackson became the seventh President of the United States. General Winfield Scott served as an Army officer for over 50 years. Even though he was a Virginian, Scott refused to fight for the Confederacy during the Civil War.
 
Andrew Jackson (1767-1845)
7th U.S. President
Although born in South Carolina (some historians claim North Carolina), Jackson started his professional life and made his name in Tennessee. It was in Tennessee that Jackson built his successful law practice and became a powerful landowner. He commanded 2,500 Tennessee militiamen in the War of 1812, before being commissioned a major general in the regular army by the federal government. Jackson gained great fame for his victory in the defense of New Orleans against a larger British force. The attack proved disastrous for the British, yet it had no effect on the war, which had ended two weeks earlier. Jackson’s victory at the Battle of New Orleans made him a national hero.
 
Jackson’s widespread popularity made him an obvious candidate for the U.S. presidency. In 1822, the Tennessee legislature nominated him for the 1824 election. Jackson won the majority of popular votes in 1824, but failed to win the election, which was decided by the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1828, Jackson won a landslide presidential victory and was re-elected in 1832.
 
Jackson did a great deal to strengthen the power of the presidency. He vetoed more bills passed by Congress than all the previous Presidents combined. Historians describe the many reforms the 7th President enacted as Jacksonian Democracy, and the 20-year period after he left office as the Age of Jackson.
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U.S. #786
1937 2¢ Jackson & Scott
Army and Navy

Issue Date:
January 15, 1937
First City: Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 93,848,500
 
After first achieving fame during the War of 1812, General Andrew Jackson became the seventh President of the United States. General Winfield Scott served as an Army officer for over 50 years. Even though he was a Virginian, Scott refused to fight for the Confederacy during the Civil War.
 
Andrew Jackson (1767-1845)
7th U.S. President
Although born in South Carolina (some historians claim North Carolina), Jackson started his professional life and made his name in Tennessee. It was in Tennessee that Jackson built his successful law practice and became a powerful landowner. He commanded 2,500 Tennessee militiamen in the War of 1812, before being commissioned a major general in the regular army by the federal government. Jackson gained great fame for his victory in the defense of New Orleans against a larger British force. The attack proved disastrous for the British, yet it had no effect on the war, which had ended two weeks earlier. Jackson’s victory at the Battle of New Orleans made him a national hero.
 
Jackson’s widespread popularity made him an obvious candidate for the U.S. presidency. In 1822, the Tennessee legislature nominated him for the 1824 election. Jackson won the majority of popular votes in 1824, but failed to win the election, which was decided by the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1828, Jackson won a landslide presidential victory and was re-elected in 1832.
 
Jackson did a great deal to strengthen the power of the presidency. He vetoed more bills passed by Congress than all the previous Presidents combined. Historians describe the many reforms the 7th President enacted as Jacksonian Democracy, and the 20-year period after he left office as the Age of Jackson.