#898 – 1940 3c Coronado Expedition

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U.S. #898
3¢ Coronado Expedition

Issue Date: September 7, 1940
City: Albuquerque, NM
Quantity: 60,943,700
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Violet
 
The 1940 Coronado Expedition stamp commemorates the 400th anniversary of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado’s two-year exploration of the American Southwest. The stamp features a reproduction of Gerald Cassidy’s painting, Coronado and His Captains. The top right corner of the stamp features the Coronado coat of arms. 
 
This was the last postage stamp issued under Postmaster General James A. Farley (famous for his role in the Farley’s Follies). He resigned because he disagreed with President Roosevelt’s decision to run for an unprecedented third term.
 
Francisco Vasquez de Coronado
Francisco Vazquez de Coronado was born in Salamanca, Spain, in 1510, just as Spain was discovering and exploring the New World. In 1535, he first traveled to Mexico with Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza. Three years later he was appointed governor of New Galicia. In this position, he heard numerous stories from native Indians about the Seven Cities of Cibola, reportedly filled with gold. 
 
In February 1540, he and his men set out in search of the fabled city, traveling far north through what would later become the American states of New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas. After two years of searching, Coronado returned to Mexico empty-handed, disappointing the Spanish government. 
 
Several years after Coronado’s death in 1554, people began to realize just what an impressive journey he had made and how valuable the territory he claimed could be.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #898. Introduced to stamp collecting at a young age by his mother, Franklin Delano Roosevelt turned to his collection throughout his life to relax and unwind. 
 
Elected President four times, Roosevelt served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt shared his love of stamps with the nation, personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. He suggested topics, rejected others, and even designed some himself. It was his aim to use stamps not just to send mail but also to educate Americans about our history. And as he reluctantly entered America into World War II, he saw these stamps as an outlet to raise spirits and bring hope.
 
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U.S. #898
3¢ Coronado Expedition

Issue Date: September 7, 1940
City: Albuquerque, NM
Quantity: 60,943,700
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Violet
 
The 1940 Coronado Expedition stamp commemorates the 400th anniversary of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado’s two-year exploration of the American Southwest. The stamp features a reproduction of Gerald Cassidy’s painting, Coronado and His Captains. The top right corner of the stamp features the Coronado coat of arms. 
 
This was the last postage stamp issued under Postmaster General James A. Farley (famous for his role in the Farley’s Follies). He resigned because he disagreed with President Roosevelt’s decision to run for an unprecedented third term.
 
Francisco Vasquez de Coronado
Francisco Vazquez de Coronado was born in Salamanca, Spain, in 1510, just as Spain was discovering and exploring the New World. In 1535, he first traveled to Mexico with Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza. Three years later he was appointed governor of New Galicia. In this position, he heard numerous stories from native Indians about the Seven Cities of Cibola, reportedly filled with gold. 
 
In February 1540, he and his men set out in search of the fabled city, traveling far north through what would later become the American states of New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas. After two years of searching, Coronado returned to Mexico empty-handed, disappointing the Spanish government. 
 
Several years after Coronado’s death in 1554, people began to realize just what an impressive journey he had made and how valuable the territory he claimed could be.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #898. Introduced to stamp collecting at a young age by his mother, Franklin Delano Roosevelt turned to his collection throughout his life to relax and unwind. 
 
Elected President four times, Roosevelt served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt shared his love of stamps with the nation, personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. He suggested topics, rejected others, and even designed some himself. It was his aim to use stamps not just to send mail but also to educate Americans about our history. And as he reluctantly entered America into World War II, he saw these stamps as an outlet to raise spirits and bring hope.