#907 – 1943 2c Allied Nations

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camera Mint Plate Block of 4
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camera Mint Sheet(s)
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camera Classic First Day Cover
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- MM750Mystic Black Mount Size 27/31 (50)
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U.S. #907
2¢ Allied Nations

Issue Date: January 14, 1943
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 1,671,564,200
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Rose carmine
 
U.S. #907, like the “Win the War” stamp before it, was issued as part of a campaign to raise support for U.S. involvement in World War II.
 
Allied Nations for Peace
Following the harsh criticism of the “Win the War” stamp (U.S. #905) several artists submitted more creative designs with similar war victory themes. President Roosevelt rejected them all, as he believed the stamps should represent world peace and cooperation in addition to victory. 
 
President Roosevelt eventually found a drawing by Leon Helguera of New York picturing an army of raised swords behind an uplifted palm branch of peace. This image perfectly illustrated the message the President wanted to convey. However, when the stamp was issued, collectors and the general public did not entirely understand the stamp’s meaning. Many were also uncomfortable with the image of so many uplifted swords. Despite this, the stamp, along with the “Win the War” and “Four Freedoms” issues, was one of the biggest-selling stamps of World War II. 
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #907. Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s mother introduced the future President to stamp collecting at a young age. Throughout his life, he turned to his collection to relax and unwind. 
 
Roosevelt was elected President four times, serving in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt promoted the importance of stamps by personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. This included suggesting topics, rejecting others, and even designing some of the stamps himself. He used U.S. postage stamps to educate Americans about their heritage, to buoy war-weary spirits during World War II, and to send a message of peace and hope as Europe faced the overwhelming task of rebuilding.
 
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U.S. #907
2¢ Allied Nations

Issue Date: January 14, 1943
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 1,671,564,200
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Rose carmine
 
U.S. #907, like the “Win the War” stamp before it, was issued as part of a campaign to raise support for U.S. involvement in World War II.
 
Allied Nations for Peace
Following the harsh criticism of the “Win the War” stamp (U.S. #905) several artists submitted more creative designs with similar war victory themes. President Roosevelt rejected them all, as he believed the stamps should represent world peace and cooperation in addition to victory. 
 
President Roosevelt eventually found a drawing by Leon Helguera of New York picturing an army of raised swords behind an uplifted palm branch of peace. This image perfectly illustrated the message the President wanted to convey. However, when the stamp was issued, collectors and the general public did not entirely understand the stamp’s meaning. Many were also uncomfortable with the image of so many uplifted swords. Despite this, the stamp, along with the “Win the War” and “Four Freedoms” issues, was one of the biggest-selling stamps of World War II. 
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #907. Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s mother introduced the future President to stamp collecting at a young age. Throughout his life, he turned to his collection to relax and unwind. 
 
Roosevelt was elected President four times, serving in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt promoted the importance of stamps by personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. This included suggesting topics, rejecting others, and even designing some of the stamps himself. He used U.S. postage stamps to educate Americans about their heritage, to buoy war-weary spirits during World War II, and to send a message of peace and hope as Europe faced the overwhelming task of rebuilding.