#919 – 1943 5c Flag of Austria

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.80
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.45
4 More - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
camera Mint Plate Block of 4
Ships in 1 business day. i
$9.00
camera Mint Sheet(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$40.00
camera Fleetwood First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$9.00
camera First Day Cover Plate Block of 4
Ships in 1 business day. i
$12.00
Grading Guide

Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM50150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 30 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
 
U.S. #919
5¢ Flag of Austria
Overrun Countries Series

Issue Date: November 23, 1943
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 14,999,646
Printed by: American Bank Note Company
Printing Method: Flat-Plate
Perforations:
12
Color: Blue violet, red, and black
 
U.S. #919 is part of the Overrun Countries Series, which honors each of the nations invaded by Axis powers during World War II. It pictures the flag of Austria, which features two red horizontal bands with a white band in between. It is one of the oldest national flag designs in the world. According to legend, Duke Leopold V invented the flag design during the Crusades. Following a battle, his white clothes were drenched in blood, but when he removed his belt the white cloth underneath was still clean.
 
Austria History
Austria has been inhabited since prehistoric times, originally settled by the Celts. Later it was invaded regularly, first by the Romans, then by Vandals, Goths, Huns and others. The Austro-Hungarian Empire lasted from 1867 until it was destroyed during World War I. 
 
The final invasion was Hitler in 1938. (The Rogers and Hammerstein hit musical “The Sound of Music” takes place in the Austrian Alps during Hitler’s Anschluss.) The Allied Forces liberated Austria in 1945. Full independence was re-established in 1955.
 
These Stamps Brought Hope to Overrun Countries of WW II
After receiving several designs from artists who felt the current U.S. postage stamps were unattractive, President Franklin Roosevelt began to consider the types of stamps he wanted to issue. He sought to show the world that America was in this war to achieve world peace, not military dominance. With this in mind, the President suggested the U.S. issue a series of stamps picturing the flags of all the overrun nations in Europe. 
 
In the border surrounding each flag, Roosevelt suggested picturing the Phoenix – an ancient symbol of rebirth. He believed “It might tell those suffering victims in Europe that we are struggling for their own regeneration.” The other side of each flag pictured a kneeling woman “breaking the shackles of oppression.” 
 
When the time came to print the stamps, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing was unable to print the multiple colors needed for each flag, so the American Bank Note Company received a special contract for this series. 
 
Additionally, a 5¢ denomination – the foreign rate for first class postage – was chosen so the stamps could be used on overseas mail.  The stamps were printed in relatively small quantities and were in high demand as soon as they were issued, with stocks across the country running out almost as soon as they were released.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #919. Introduced to stamp collecting at a young age by his mother, Franklin Delano Roosevelt turned to his collection throughout his life to relax and unwind. 
 
Elected President four times, Roosevelt served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt shared his love of stamps with the nation, personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. He suggested topics, rejected others, and even designed some himself. It was his aim to use stamps not just to send mail but also to educate Americans about our history. And as he reluctantly entered America into World War II, he saw these stamps as an outlet to raise spirits and bring hope.
 
 
Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #919
5¢ Flag of Austria
Overrun Countries Series

Issue Date: November 23, 1943
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 14,999,646
Printed by: American Bank Note Company
Printing Method: Flat-Plate
Perforations:
12
Color: Blue violet, red, and black
 
U.S. #919 is part of the Overrun Countries Series, which honors each of the nations invaded by Axis powers during World War II. It pictures the flag of Austria, which features two red horizontal bands with a white band in between. It is one of the oldest national flag designs in the world. According to legend, Duke Leopold V invented the flag design during the Crusades. Following a battle, his white clothes were drenched in blood, but when he removed his belt the white cloth underneath was still clean.
 
Austria History
Austria has been inhabited since prehistoric times, originally settled by the Celts. Later it was invaded regularly, first by the Romans, then by Vandals, Goths, Huns and others. The Austro-Hungarian Empire lasted from 1867 until it was destroyed during World War I. 
 
The final invasion was Hitler in 1938. (The Rogers and Hammerstein hit musical “The Sound of Music” takes place in the Austrian Alps during Hitler’s Anschluss.) The Allied Forces liberated Austria in 1945. Full independence was re-established in 1955.
 
These Stamps Brought Hope to Overrun Countries of WW II
After receiving several designs from artists who felt the current U.S. postage stamps were unattractive, President Franklin Roosevelt began to consider the types of stamps he wanted to issue. He sought to show the world that America was in this war to achieve world peace, not military dominance. With this in mind, the President suggested the U.S. issue a series of stamps picturing the flags of all the overrun nations in Europe. 
 
In the border surrounding each flag, Roosevelt suggested picturing the Phoenix – an ancient symbol of rebirth. He believed “It might tell those suffering victims in Europe that we are struggling for their own regeneration.” The other side of each flag pictured a kneeling woman “breaking the shackles of oppression.” 
 
When the time came to print the stamps, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing was unable to print the multiple colors needed for each flag, so the American Bank Note Company received a special contract for this series. 
 
Additionally, a 5¢ denomination – the foreign rate for first class postage – was chosen so the stamps could be used on overseas mail.  The stamps were printed in relatively small quantities and were in high demand as soon as they were issued, with stocks across the country running out almost as soon as they were released.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #919. Introduced to stamp collecting at a young age by his mother, Franklin Delano Roosevelt turned to his collection throughout his life to relax and unwind. 
 
Elected President four times, Roosevelt served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt shared his love of stamps with the nation, personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. He suggested topics, rejected others, and even designed some himself. It was his aim to use stamps not just to send mail but also to educate Americans about our history. And as he reluctantly entered America into World War II, he saw these stamps as an outlet to raise spirits and bring hope.