#963 – 1948 3c Saluting Young America

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U.S. #963
3¢ Salute to Youth
 
Issue Date: August 11, 1948
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 77,800,500
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10 1/2
Color: Deep blue
 
U.S. #963 honors the youth of America. The stamp pictures a young boy and girl walking together carrying books.
 
Saluting America’s Youth
Former assistant postmaster general Gael Sullivan, who was at that time Executive Director of the Theater Owners of America, first requested the issue of this stamp. Coincidentally, the chairman of the National Youth Month Committee at the time was a movie mogul named Charles P. Skouras. This organization was created to end juvenile delinquency. 
 
According to then-Postmaster General Jesse M. Donaldson, “The Post Office Department is proud to play a part in the observance of Youth Month. America looks to its youth of today, because the future destiny of this country depends in large measure on the younger generation. Only by continuing to recognize the importance of the men and women of tomorrow can American maintain the strong bulwark of freedom that is today.” 
 
President Harry Truman hosted the first day ceremony for this stamp at the White House. 
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U.S. #963
3¢ Salute to Youth
 
Issue Date: August 11, 1948
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 77,800,500
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10 1/2
Color: Deep blue
 
U.S. #963 honors the youth of America. The stamp pictures a young boy and girl walking together carrying books.
 
Saluting America’s Youth
Former assistant postmaster general Gael Sullivan, who was at that time Executive Director of the Theater Owners of America, first requested the issue of this stamp. Coincidentally, the chairman of the National Youth Month Committee at the time was a movie mogul named Charles P. Skouras. This organization was created to end juvenile delinquency. 
 
According to then-Postmaster General Jesse M. Donaldson, “The Post Office Department is proud to play a part in the observance of Youth Month. America looks to its youth of today, because the future destiny of this country depends in large measure on the younger generation. Only by continuing to recognize the importance of the men and women of tomorrow can American maintain the strong bulwark of freedom that is today.” 
 
President Harry Truman hosted the first day ceremony for this stamp at the White House.