#C68 – 1963 8c Amelia Earhart

 
U.S. #C68
1963 8¢ Amelia Earhart

Issue Date: July 24, 1963
City: Atchinson, KS
Quantity: 63,890,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Giori press printing
Perforations:
11
Color: Carmine and Maroon
 
#C68 honors Amelia Earhart, the “First Woman in Flight.”
 
In 1932, Earhart soloed across the Atlantic Ocean in her plane, Friendship. In 1935, she conquered the Pacific from Hawaii to California. In 1937, she began a 27,000-mile around-the-world flight. Fred Noonan was her navigator, and by late June, they had completed the next-to-last leg of their journey. In July, radio contact with her plane was lost, and neither the bodies nor the plane were ever found. To this day, their fate remains a mystery.
 
 
 
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U.S. #C68
1963 8¢ Amelia Earhart

Issue Date: July 24, 1963
City: Atchinson, KS
Quantity: 63,890,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Giori press printing
Perforations:
11
Color: Carmine and Maroon
 
#C68 honors Amelia Earhart, the “First Woman in Flight.”
 
In 1932, Earhart soloed across the Atlantic Ocean in her plane, Friendship. In 1935, she conquered the Pacific from Hawaii to California. In 1937, she began a 27,000-mile around-the-world flight. Fred Noonan was her navigator, and by late June, they had completed the next-to-last leg of their journey. In July, radio contact with her plane was lost, and neither the bodies nor the plane were ever found. To this day, their fate remains a mystery.