#CE1 – 1934 16c Airmail Spec Delivery

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.40
$1.40
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.25
$1.25
- Unused Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.10
$1.10
- Used Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.00FREE with 220 points!
$1.00
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM67145x32mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.25
$4.25
 
U.S. #CE1
1934 16¢ Great Seal
Air Post Special Delivery

Issue Date: August 30, 1934
City: Chicago, IL
Quantity: 9,215,750
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat plate printing
Perforations:
11
Color: Dark blue
 

First U.S. Airmail Special Delivery Stamp

On August 30, 1934, the U.S. Post Office issued its first Airmail Special Delivery stamp.

The 16¢ blue Airmail Special Delivery stamp was issued to prepay, with one stamp, the air postage and the special delivery fee. Mail with this stamp would travel by plane to its designated post office, where, upon arrival, a messenger would deliver it immediately to the recipient.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was an avid collector, designed the stamp. Its first day of sale was August 30th, at the convention of the American Air Mail Society in Chicago. Two years later, the stamp was reprinted using two colors – carmine and blue.

Airmail special delivery stamps were only in use for a brief time. After 1936 the fees for special delivery service on airmail was to be paid by additional regular special delivery stamps.

U.S. #CE1 was part of the “Farley’s Follies” debacle of the 1930s. Starting in 1933, Postmaster General James Farley had sheets of newly produced stamps removed before they were gummed and perforated. He gave them to President Roosevelt and other high-ranking officials. Collectors protested – these were specifically made rarities that were not available to the public! On February 5, 1935, the problem was solved. All the stamps issued since March 4, 1933, were re-issued in imperforate, ungummed condition in such quantities as the public required.

U.S. #771 was the last of Farley’s Follies. It has the exact design and color of #CE1, and paid the extra fees on Airmail Special Delivery. The stamp was sold at the Philatelic Agency for only two months. The difference between U.S. #771 and the original “Folly” version (the stamps given as gifts to Roosevelt and others), is that the normally issued stamp is imperforate.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty 2021 First Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty

    In 2021, the United States Postal Service anticipated the arrival of spring with a new set of 10 Forever stamps honoring Garden Beauty.  Order yours today!

    $10.95- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels  May Include Targets, Stars, Numbers, or Grids. Set of 5 with small imperfections Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels
    Since they first appeared in the 19th century, fancy cancels have been extremely sought-after by collectors.  Act now to add five of these to your collection.  Stamps may vary, but that's half the fun!
    $12.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the American flag, Alexander Hamilton, Religious Freedom, Overland Mail, NATO, and more.  This money saving offer saves you over $90!  Order your set today.
    $89.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #CE1
1934 16¢ Great Seal
Air Post Special Delivery

Issue Date: August 30, 1934
City: Chicago, IL
Quantity: 9,215,750
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat plate printing
Perforations:
11
Color: Dark blue
 

First U.S. Airmail Special Delivery Stamp

On August 30, 1934, the U.S. Post Office issued its first Airmail Special Delivery stamp.

The 16¢ blue Airmail Special Delivery stamp was issued to prepay, with one stamp, the air postage and the special delivery fee. Mail with this stamp would travel by plane to its designated post office, where, upon arrival, a messenger would deliver it immediately to the recipient.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was an avid collector, designed the stamp. Its first day of sale was August 30th, at the convention of the American Air Mail Society in Chicago. Two years later, the stamp was reprinted using two colors – carmine and blue.

Airmail special delivery stamps were only in use for a brief time. After 1936 the fees for special delivery service on airmail was to be paid by additional regular special delivery stamps.

U.S. #CE1 was part of the “Farley’s Follies” debacle of the 1930s. Starting in 1933, Postmaster General James Farley had sheets of newly produced stamps removed before they were gummed and perforated. He gave them to President Roosevelt and other high-ranking officials. Collectors protested – these were specifically made rarities that were not available to the public! On February 5, 1935, the problem was solved. All the stamps issued since March 4, 1933, were re-issued in imperforate, ungummed condition in such quantities as the public required.

U.S. #771 was the last of Farley’s Follies. It has the exact design and color of #CE1, and paid the extra fees on Airmail Special Delivery. The stamp was sold at the Philatelic Agency for only two months. The difference between U.S. #771 and the original “Folly” version (the stamps given as gifts to Roosevelt and others), is that the normally issued stamp is imperforate.