#J38 – 1895 1c Postage Due Stamp

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Usually ships within 30 days.i$19.00
$19.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.40FREE with 310 points!
$1.40
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$9.50
$9.50
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.10FREE with 240 points!
$1.10
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50327x30mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50

  Postage Due Stamps

 Postage Due stamps were authorized in 1879 and were unique, since they were the first stamps issued which didn’t prepay for the delivery of mail.  Instead, they denoted the amount of postage due on mail that was insufficiently prepaid.  This amount was paid not by the sender, but rather by the recipient of the letter.

Designed solely for functional purposes, the stamps were plain with large numerals indicating the amount to be paid.  For twenty-five years, this design remained unchanged – although the colors varied from a brown to red brown to a deep red.  These first issues were printed by the American Bank Note Company and were released on July 1, 1879.

 In 1894, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing took over the contract for producing the Postage Due stamps, and the design changed slightly.  While the early issues featured the numeral in an oval, these new releases had the value figure in a diamond.

 In 1930, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing changed the designs so that the numerals were featured in a half-circle.  The following year, in 1931, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing changed the format of some of the stamps slightly – a horizontal format was used as opposed to the vertical one used previously.  The design remained the same, however.

 In 1959, the Postage Due stamps were printed in two colors for the first time.  The designs of these issues were similar to the 1930-31 stamps.  However, the border and background were printed in a carmine rose, while the numerals were printed in black.  In addition to the color change, new values were also used.  In 1985, the Postage Due stamps were discontinued by the Postal Service and are now obsolete.

Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamp - Holiday Delights 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Holiday Delights

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 4 new Forever stamps picturing Holiday Delights.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $4.50- $21.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection, 212 mint stamps 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection of 212 Mint Stamps
    Save time and money with this year-set.  You'll receive every US commemorative stamp with a major Scott number issued in 2019 in one order.  Plus, get the seven mint sheets pictured in our 2019 Heirloom Supplement.  It's the easy way to keep your collection up to date. 
    $219.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps
    Act now to get an instant collection of 650 used U.S. definitive stamps in one easy order! Definitive stamps are the backbone of the U.S. postal system and essential additions to your collection. Take advantage of this money-saving offer and make your collection grow fast.
    $32.95
    BUY NOW

  Postage Due Stamps

 Postage Due stamps were authorized in 1879 and were unique, since they were the first stamps issued which didn’t prepay for the delivery of mail.  Instead, they denoted the amount of postage due on mail that was insufficiently prepaid.  This amount was paid not by the sender, but rather by the recipient of the letter.

Designed solely for functional purposes, the stamps were plain with large numerals indicating the amount to be paid.  For twenty-five years, this design remained unchanged – although the colors varied from a brown to red brown to a deep red.  These first issues were printed by the American Bank Note Company and were released on July 1, 1879.

 In 1894, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing took over the contract for producing the Postage Due stamps, and the design changed slightly.  While the early issues featured the numeral in an oval, these new releases had the value figure in a diamond.

 In 1930, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing changed the designs so that the numerals were featured in a half-circle.  The following year, in 1931, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing changed the format of some of the stamps slightly – a horizontal format was used as opposed to the vertical one used previously.  The design remained the same, however.

 In 1959, the Postage Due stamps were printed in two colors for the first time.  The designs of these issues were similar to the 1930-31 stamps.  However, the border and background were printed in a carmine rose, while the numerals were printed in black.  In addition to the color change, new values were also used.  In 1985, the Postage Due stamps were discontinued by the Postal Service and are now obsolete.