Check out is temporarily disabled for site maintenance. You can still shop, add items to your cart or read articles.

#PS4 – 1911 10c Postal Savings, deep blue, watermark

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$6.00
$6.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.25
$1.25
- Unused Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$4.25
$4.25
- Used Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.00
$1.00
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM75027x31mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
The Postal Savings System was established to serve small investors living in rural communities. Under the program, lower and middle income individuals were able to deposit funds at their local post office. Postal Mail stamps, given as proof of the deposit, were redeemable in the form of credits to Postal Savings accounts.
 
President Theodore Roosevelt first promoted the Postal Savings System as a solution to public distrust of traditional banks. A Congressional act established the system effective January 1, 1911. Under the act, the Postal Savings System paid two percent interest per year. The minimum deposit was $1.00 with a maximum of $2,500.00.  Postal Savings Stamps were issued January 3, 1911, with a 10¢ denomination. A 10¢ deposit card was also issued on that date.
 
The Postal Savings System proved to be very popular among rural Americans, immigrants familiar with similar systems in their native countries, and working people who were unable to conduct transactions during the limited hours of traditional banks. Postal Savings deposits could be made six days per week between the hours of 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. The system eventually extended to over 5,000 post offices in 48 states.
 
Deposits to the U.S. Postal Savings System declined after World War II. The Post Office Department stopped accepting deposits on April 27, 1966, and officially ended the program the following year.
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps, plus FREE 2014 Imperforate Semi-Postal, 8 stamps 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps

    Semi-postal stamps are issued to serve a double purpose.  Priced higher than regular postage, they pay the current mailing rate plus an added amount contributed to a charitable cause.  As of 2019, eight semi-postal (sometimes called "fundraising") stamps had been issued.  Now you can get them in one easy order and receive the B5a imperforate semi-postal FREE!

    $13.50
    BUY NOW
  • 1990s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1990s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers highlighted Looney Tunes characters, statehood anniversaries, Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Elvis Presley, Dorothy Parker, and more.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 stamps, used 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 used stamps

    This set of 24 postally used 1922-32 regular issues stamps is a great addition to your collection. Order today to receive: 571, 610, 632, 634, 635, 636, 637, 638, 639, 640, 641, 642, 653,684, 685, 692, 693, 694, 697, 698, 699, 700, 701, and 720.

    $6.25
    BUY NOW

The Postal Savings System was established to serve small investors living in rural communities. Under the program, lower and middle income individuals were able to deposit funds at their local post office. Postal Mail stamps, given as proof of the deposit, were redeemable in the form of credits to Postal Savings accounts.
 
President Theodore Roosevelt first promoted the Postal Savings System as a solution to public distrust of traditional banks. A Congressional act established the system effective January 1, 1911. Under the act, the Postal Savings System paid two percent interest per year. The minimum deposit was $1.00 with a maximum of $2,500.00.  Postal Savings Stamps were issued January 3, 1911, with a 10¢ denomination. A 10¢ deposit card was also issued on that date.
 
The Postal Savings System proved to be very popular among rural Americans, immigrants familiar with similar systems in their native countries, and working people who were unable to conduct transactions during the limited hours of traditional banks. Postal Savings deposits could be made six days per week between the hours of 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. The system eventually extended to over 5,000 post offices in 48 states.
 
Deposits to the U.S. Postal Savings System declined after World War II. The Post Office Department stopped accepting deposits on April 27, 1966, and officially ended the program the following year.