#Q1 – 1912-13 1c Parcel Post Stamp

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$4.50
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.00
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.00
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 290 points!
$1.30
3 More - Click Here
U.S. #Q1
1912 1¢ Post Office Clerk
Parcel Post
 
Issue Date: 1913
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 209,691,094
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
12
Color: Carmine rose
 
In 1912, the U.S. Postal Department introduced parcel post service for sending items weighing 16 ounces or more through the mail.  The mail is divided into four classes, with parcel post making up the fourth class.  Almost any type of merchandise can be mailed parcel post, including day – old chicks, baby alligators, and honeybees.  Only items that could be dangerous to handle cannot be sent through Parcel Post. Rural Americans used the new mail class to access goods and merchandise they could not have gotten before, giving rise to mail order giants like Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Montgomery Ward and Co.
 
Twelve stamps with various denominations were issued in 1912-13 to prepay the fourth-class rate.  Although different vignette designs were featured, all twelve stamps used the same border and color, which caused a great deal of confusion for postal workers.
 
The 1¢ Parcel Post Stamp
The four Parcel Post stamps with the lowest denominations feature Postal Service employees at their jobs. The 1¢ stamp pictures a post office clerk at the distribution section of Washington D.C.’s post office. The job of the postal clerk is to sort the mail and provide retail services to customers. The stamp pictures the clerk sorting packages to go to different sections of the city or parts of the country. Beginning on November 27, 1912, almost 210 million of these 1¢ stamps were issued.
 
Less than a year later, the Postmaster General authorized ordinary postage for use on parcel post.  Parcel post stamps were then made valid for all classes of mail and were used as regular postage until the supply was depleted. 

 
Read More - Click Here

  • U.S. Album with 100 postally used stamps, 1,000 hinges, and a free stamp collecting guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #Q1
1912 1¢ Post Office Clerk
Parcel Post
 
Issue Date: 1913
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 209,691,094
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
12
Color: Carmine rose
 
In 1912, the U.S. Postal Department introduced parcel post service for sending items weighing 16 ounces or more through the mail.  The mail is divided into four classes, with parcel post making up the fourth class.  Almost any type of merchandise can be mailed parcel post, including day – old chicks, baby alligators, and honeybees.  Only items that could be dangerous to handle cannot be sent through Parcel Post. Rural Americans used the new mail class to access goods and merchandise they could not have gotten before, giving rise to mail order giants like Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Montgomery Ward and Co.
 
Twelve stamps with various denominations were issued in 1912-13 to prepay the fourth-class rate.  Although different vignette designs were featured, all twelve stamps used the same border and color, which caused a great deal of confusion for postal workers.
 
The 1¢ Parcel Post Stamp
The four Parcel Post stamps with the lowest denominations feature Postal Service employees at their jobs. The 1¢ stamp pictures a post office clerk at the distribution section of Washington D.C.’s post office. The job of the postal clerk is to sort the mail and provide retail services to customers. The stamp pictures the clerk sorting packages to go to different sections of the city or parts of the country. Beginning on November 27, 1912, almost 210 million of these 1¢ stamps were issued.
 
Less than a year later, the Postmaster General authorized ordinary postage for use on parcel post.  Parcel post stamps were then made valid for all classes of mail and were used as regular postage until the supply was depleted.