#RY3 – 1938 $1 grn, 28x331/2mm, perf 11

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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The stamp offered here, RY3, is an example of the $1 Firearms Tax stamp used for concealable weapons other than handguns.  This seldom-seen mint stamp is over 80 years old, watermarked 191R, and was issued ungummed.  If you specialize in Revenues, it’s one history-laden stamp you should capture for your collection.  It recalls the days of Prohibition plus Al Capone, John Dillinger, and other famous gangsters of the 1920s and 30s.  Read on to discover the story behind the stamp…

The National Firearms Act of 1934 was enacted as part of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code.  The act levied federal taxes on the manufacture, sale, and transfer of certain classes of firearms used to commit violent crimes.  This was the first time the federal government sought to control the sale of such weapons to private citizens.  The act is still enforced today.

The government’s taxing of specific firearms came about in response to the rise of organized crime in many U.S. cities.  For that reason, the act had the support of the public.  These were the days when crime families (syndicates) were fighting each other for territorial control.  They endangered the public’s safety, not only with their criminal activities, but more and more with their gun battles with each other.

The Firearms Act wasn’t designed to control all firearms, but rather those used by organized crime, such as machine guns, sawed-off shot guns and rifles, and silencers.  These types of weapons were taxed at $200, a huge sum for the era, and comparable to several thousand dollars today.  The tax remains at $200. 

Also taxed, but at a fraction of the cost, were other unusual weapons, including those disguised as common objects such as canes, umbrellas, and cigarette lighters, that could be concealed and shoot ammunition.  The tax for this class of weapon was only $1 from 1934 to 1960.  It was later raised to $5, the amount of the tax today. 

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The stamp offered here, RY3, is an example of the $1 Firearms Tax stamp used for concealable weapons other than handguns.  This seldom-seen mint stamp is over 80 years old, watermarked 191R, and was issued ungummed.  If you specialize in Revenues, it’s one history-laden stamp you should capture for your collection.  It recalls the days of Prohibition plus Al Capone, John Dillinger, and other famous gangsters of the 1920s and 30s.  Read on to discover the story behind the stamp…

The National Firearms Act of 1934 was enacted as part of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code.  The act levied federal taxes on the manufacture, sale, and transfer of certain classes of firearms used to commit violent crimes.  This was the first time the federal government sought to control the sale of such weapons to private citizens.  The act is still enforced today.

The government’s taxing of specific firearms came about in response to the rise of organized crime in many U.S. cities.  For that reason, the act had the support of the public.  These were the days when crime families (syndicates) were fighting each other for territorial control.  They endangered the public’s safety, not only with their criminal activities, but more and more with their gun battles with each other.

The Firearms Act wasn’t designed to control all firearms, but rather those used by organized crime, such as machine guns, sawed-off shot guns and rifles, and silencers.  These types of weapons were taxed at $200, a huge sum for the era, and comparable to several thousand dollars today.  The tax remains at $200. 

Also taxed, but at a fraction of the cost, were other unusual weapons, including those disguised as common objects such as canes, umbrellas, and cigarette lighters, that could be concealed and shoot ammunition.  The tax for this class of weapon was only $1 from 1934 to 1960.  It was later raised to $5, the amount of the tax today.