#1585-88 – 1986 Sweden - Stamp Collecting

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Price
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- Mint Complete Booklet
Never Hinged
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1986 STOCKHOLMIA Sweden Joint-Issue Booklet

Limited Quantity – Get yours now while it’s still available and affordable!

 
Stamp-collecting booklet issued to celebrate 100th anniversary of the Swedish Philatelic Society recreates the famous 1879 “Tretio” stamp error.  Desirable for freak and error collectors!
 
Joint Issue: US 2198-2201
 
 
Discover the story behind the stamps...
 
The 1986 STOCKHOLMIA booklet commemoratives were born out of the friendly relationship between the postal departments of Sweden and the United States.  Both countries planned to host international stamp exhibitions in 1986 (STOCKHOLMIA and AMERIPEX), and decided to create joint issues honoring philatelic subjects.
 
For Sweden, 1986 marked the 250th anniversary of their post office AND the 100th anniversary of the Swedish Philatelic Society.  Meanwhile, the United States celebrated the 100th anniversary of the American Philatelic Society as well as the centennial of the Smithsonian National Postal Museum accepting stamps for the National Collection.
 
Sweden’s stamp booklet also made use of four stamp designs.  The first stamp pictured the famous “Tretio” error, in which the numeral reads 20 but the lettering says 30 krona.  The second stamp honors Sven Ewert, the engraver responsible for most of Sweden’s stamps between 1928 and the late 1950s.  The third stamp is similar (but not identical) to the third stamp in the US issue.  And the fourth stamp features a young boy soaking stamps for his collection.
 
America's issue also included four designs.  The first stamp pictured a block of 12 green 1887 2¢ Washington stamps with an 1886 cancel.  The second stamp design showed a young boy with a collection of dog stamps.  The third stamp featured the 1938 commemorative honoring Swedish and Finnish settlement.  The fourth and final design gave a sneak-peek of the Presidential sheetlets that would be issued later that year in May – this was the first US stamp to picture another stamp that was not yet available to the public.
 
 
 
 
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1986 STOCKHOLMIA Sweden Joint-Issue Booklet

Limited Quantity – Get yours now while it’s still available and affordable!

 
Stamp-collecting booklet issued to celebrate 100th anniversary of the Swedish Philatelic Society recreates the famous 1879 “Tretio” stamp error.  Desirable for freak and error collectors!
 
Joint Issue: US 2198-2201
 
 
Discover the story behind the stamps...
 
The 1986 STOCKHOLMIA booklet commemoratives were born out of the friendly relationship between the postal departments of Sweden and the United States.  Both countries planned to host international stamp exhibitions in 1986 (STOCKHOLMIA and AMERIPEX), and decided to create joint issues honoring philatelic subjects.
 
For Sweden, 1986 marked the 250th anniversary of their post office AND the 100th anniversary of the Swedish Philatelic Society.  Meanwhile, the United States celebrated the 100th anniversary of the American Philatelic Society as well as the centennial of the Smithsonian National Postal Museum accepting stamps for the National Collection.
 
Sweden’s stamp booklet also made use of four stamp designs.  The first stamp pictured the famous “Tretio” error, in which the numeral reads 20 but the lettering says 30 krona.  The second stamp honors Sven Ewert, the engraver responsible for most of Sweden’s stamps between 1928 and the late 1950s.  The third stamp is similar (but not identical) to the third stamp in the US issue.  And the fourth stamp features a young boy soaking stamps for his collection.
 
America's issue also included four designs.  The first stamp pictured a block of 12 green 1887 2¢ Washington stamps with an 1886 cancel.  The second stamp design showed a young boy with a collection of dog stamps.  The third stamp featured the 1938 commemorative honoring Swedish and Finnish settlement.  The fourth and final design gave a sneak-peek of the Presidential sheetlets that would be issued later that year in May – this was the first US stamp to picture another stamp that was not yet available to the public.