#CZ107 – 1929 5c Canal Zone - 'Gaillard Cut' - blue, flat plate printing, unwatermarked

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Price
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- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$4.50
$4.50
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.75
$1.75
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
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camera Mint Plate Block
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$28.25
CZ107 – 1929 5¢ Gaillard Cut
 
This stamp pictures the Gaillard Cut, which was named after Major David DuBose Gaillard.  Gaillard was in charge of the Central Division, which included all of Gatun Lake and the Culebra Cut.  Gaillard died of a brain tumor shortly before the Canal was completed, and Culebra Cut was officially changed to Gaillard Cut in his honor.

Galliard’s Cut was an American engineering feat dubbed the “Eighth Wonder of the World.”  Cut through solid rock, the project was the critical task for the completion of the Panama Canal.

Canal Zone Stamps Chronicle America’s Rise as a World Power

If you’ve never collected Canal Zone stamps before, now’s the time to start.  These intriguing stamps are historic links to our nation’s past.  With Mystic as your collecting partner, it’s easy to own stamps documenting this remarkable American engineering feat!

The U.S. Canal Zone postal service began in June of 1904 – when the United States started construction of the Panama Canal.  Stamps issued for use in the Canal Zone, which extends for five miles on either side of the 50 miles of the canal’s length, reflect U.S. administration of that area.

Stamps from Panama were used before the overprinting of U.S. stamps.  Some were overprints of Colombia stamps (Panama won its independence from Colombia in 1903).  After 1924 only U.S. overprints or Canal Zone stamps were valid for postage.

In 1928 the first permanent issue Canal Zone stamps were placed on sale.  The following year, the first Canal Zone Airmail stamp was issued and in 1941, a series of Officials were produced.  On October 25, 1978, the last Canal Zone stamp was issued.

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CZ107 – 1929 5¢ Gaillard Cut
 
This stamp pictures the Gaillard Cut, which was named after Major David DuBose Gaillard.  Gaillard was in charge of the Central Division, which included all of Gatun Lake and the Culebra Cut.  Gaillard died of a brain tumor shortly before the Canal was completed, and Culebra Cut was officially changed to Gaillard Cut in his honor.

Galliard’s Cut was an American engineering feat dubbed the “Eighth Wonder of the World.”  Cut through solid rock, the project was the critical task for the completion of the Panama Canal.

Canal Zone Stamps Chronicle America’s Rise as a World Power

If you’ve never collected Canal Zone stamps before, now’s the time to start.  These intriguing stamps are historic links to our nation’s past.  With Mystic as your collecting partner, it’s easy to own stamps documenting this remarkable American engineering feat!

The U.S. Canal Zone postal service began in June of 1904 – when the United States started construction of the Panama Canal.  Stamps issued for use in the Canal Zone, which extends for five miles on either side of the 50 miles of the canal’s length, reflect U.S. administration of that area.

Stamps from Panama were used before the overprinting of U.S. stamps.  Some were overprints of Colombia stamps (Panama won its independence from Colombia in 1903).  After 1924 only U.S. overprints or Canal Zone stamps were valid for postage.

In 1928 the first permanent issue Canal Zone stamps were placed on sale.  The following year, the first Canal Zone Airmail stamp was issued and in 1941, a series of Officials were produced.  On October 25, 1978, the last Canal Zone stamp was issued.