#H11R – 1889 13c org red, reprint

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$325.00
$325.00
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$225.00
$225.00
This stamp was sold until 1896, mainly for philatelic purposes, as it was no longer valid for postage.  It was first released without the specimen overprint, but was used mistakenly as postage, and the remaining supply was given the specimen overprint.  In 1892, this stamp was given a black "REPRINT" overprint.

Kamehameha III

King Kamehameha III’s 30-year reign lasted the longest of any recorded Hawaiian monarch.  Kamehameha III, originally named Kauikeaouli, was an effective, generous, and diplomatic ruler.  He became king at the tender age of 10, but he was not an official ruler until 1833, when he reached 29.

Kamehameha III made sweeping changes in the governmental policies of the Sandwich Islands.  He was heavily influenced by democratic ideals, and was the first Hawaiian monarch to limit the powers of the king.  He succeeded in implementing a constitution based on that of the U.S.  One of his first acts as king was the declaration of religious freedom.  Prior to this edict, Catholic missionaries and their followers had been persecuted and imprisoned.

In 1839, Captain Cyrille Laplace arrived in the Sandwich Islands on a 60-gun French frigate, the Artémise, with several demands and the promise that war would ensue if his ultimatums were not met.  His demands were for: amnesty of Catholics previously imprisoned, donation of a site for a church, freedom of Catholic worship, and $20,000 payment to the government of France.  Although the king was absent throughout this crisis, the captain’s demands were met, and Laplace returned to France.

The next challenge to Kamehameha’s authority was a demand by Richard Charlton, British consul at Honolulu, that Kamehameha abdicate the throne and turn the Sandwich Islands over to British rule.  When British troops took up posts in Honolulu, a provisional cession of the islands to Great Britain was granted by Kamehameha, through no choice of his own.  When Charlton’s superiors in the British Navy learned of his reprehensible behavior, they reversed his decision.  The Sandwich Islands once again belonged to its people.  Upon hearing this news, Kamehameha proclaimed in a speech to the inhabitants of the islands, “The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness.”  It is the state motto to this day.

Perhaps the most radical change in government policy was the privatization of land.  The king renounced his right to ownership of all land.  After a three-year study by the king, a group of high chiefs and nobles, the “Great Mahele,” or land division, was decided upon.  The land was split into thirds, the King, the chiefs, and the people each receiving a share of land.  Kamehameha divided his share of land – keeping only half for himself, and the other half was donated to the monarchy.  This noble act caused many of the chiefs to follow his example.

Kamehameha III was a superb leader.  He was civic-minded, benevolent, and innovative.  Beginning to feel pressure from different groups in the Sandwich Islands, Kamehameha III was considering cession of the islands to America at the time of his death in 1854.  He was succeeded by Prince Alexander Liholiho, grandson of Kamehameha I, who took the name Kamehameha IV after being proclaimed king.  

Read More - Click Here


  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 50¢ The Art of Magic souvenir sheet Get The 2018 ‘Art Of Magic’ Souvenir Sheet with Special Animation Effect

    Own a mint souvenir sheet of three Art of Magic stamps featuring a white rabbit seeming to appear and disappear out of a black top hat.  The special animation effect was created using lenticular printing and makes this souvenir sheet a fun addition to your collection.  Get yours now.

    $3.95- $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

This stamp was sold until 1896, mainly for philatelic purposes, as it was no longer valid for postage.  It was first released without the specimen overprint, but was used mistakenly as postage, and the remaining supply was given the specimen overprint.  In 1892, this stamp was given a black "REPRINT" overprint.

Kamehameha III

King Kamehameha III’s 30-year reign lasted the longest of any recorded Hawaiian monarch.  Kamehameha III, originally named Kauikeaouli, was an effective, generous, and diplomatic ruler.  He became king at the tender age of 10, but he was not an official ruler until 1833, when he reached 29.

Kamehameha III made sweeping changes in the governmental policies of the Sandwich Islands.  He was heavily influenced by democratic ideals, and was the first Hawaiian monarch to limit the powers of the king.  He succeeded in implementing a constitution based on that of the U.S.  One of his first acts as king was the declaration of religious freedom.  Prior to this edict, Catholic missionaries and their followers had been persecuted and imprisoned.

In 1839, Captain Cyrille Laplace arrived in the Sandwich Islands on a 60-gun French frigate, the Artémise, with several demands and the promise that war would ensue if his ultimatums were not met.  His demands were for: amnesty of Catholics previously imprisoned, donation of a site for a church, freedom of Catholic worship, and $20,000 payment to the government of France.  Although the king was absent throughout this crisis, the captain’s demands were met, and Laplace returned to France.

The next challenge to Kamehameha’s authority was a demand by Richard Charlton, British consul at Honolulu, that Kamehameha abdicate the throne and turn the Sandwich Islands over to British rule.  When British troops took up posts in Honolulu, a provisional cession of the islands to Great Britain was granted by Kamehameha, through no choice of his own.  When Charlton’s superiors in the British Navy learned of his reprehensible behavior, they reversed his decision.  The Sandwich Islands once again belonged to its people.  Upon hearing this news, Kamehameha proclaimed in a speech to the inhabitants of the islands, “The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness.”  It is the state motto to this day.

Perhaps the most radical change in government policy was the privatization of land.  The king renounced his right to ownership of all land.  After a three-year study by the king, a group of high chiefs and nobles, the “Great Mahele,” or land division, was decided upon.  The land was split into thirds, the King, the chiefs, and the people each receiving a share of land.  Kamehameha divided his share of land – keeping only half for himself, and the other half was donated to the monarchy.  This noble act caused many of the chiefs to follow his example.

Kamehameha III was a superb leader.  He was civic-minded, benevolent, and innovative.  Beginning to feel pressure from different groups in the Sandwich Islands, Kamehameha III was considering cession of the islands to America at the time of his death in 1854.  He was succeeded by Prince Alexander Liholiho, grandson of Kamehameha I, who took the name Kamehameha IV after being proclaimed king.