#M1402 – Liberia 100 stamps

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Expand Your Collection with 100 Liberia Stamps

With one easy order, add 100 Liberia stamps to your album.  You'll discover the people, events, and culture of this great nation.

Discover More About Liberia…

Liberia is located on the western coast of Africa.  It has a land area of 43,000 square miles.  Grassland and farms dominate Liberia’s landscape, and more than half of its people live in rural areas.  The climate is hot and humid with an average temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit.  Most of Liberia has a dry and a rainy season.  In the coastal areas the dry season lasts from December to March, but inland it can go much longer.  The coast receives about 200 inches of rain annually; inland areas receive only about 85 inches.  At one time Liberia was home to a great deal of wildlife, but overhunting has taken its toll.  Today, small populations of elephants, crocodiles, pygmy hippopotamuses, antelope, and leopards can still be found in the east and northwest part of the nation.

Interestingly, Liberia became a free nation more than 110 years before any other country in Africa, making it the oldest African republic.  Liberia is also the second-oldest country in the world with mainly black citizens – only Haiti is older.  Liberia was founded in 1822 by the American Colonization Society to provide a home for freed American slaves.  The society paid for their passage to the west coast of Africa.  In 1924, the colony was named “Liber,” which means free, and Monrovia was founded as its principal settlement.  Monrovia was named for the fifth president of the United States, James Monroe.

Today, roughly 25 percent of the population of Liberia is descendants of these freed American slaves, who are historically known as Americo-Liberians.  The remaining citizens are descendants of African tribesman who settled the area in the 1400s.  The Liberian government encourages the preservation of African culture, and many tribes still practice their tribal customs and speak their native languages.

Life in Liberia’s cities, however, is much like life in the United States.  Most of the Africo-Liberians have a distinctly American lifestyle.  And as the cities expand, many farmers and fishermen from the native tribes are abandoning their own ways for newer and more modern technology.

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Expand Your Collection with 100 Liberia Stamps

With one easy order, add 100 Liberia stamps to your album.  You'll discover the people, events, and culture of this great nation.

Discover More About Liberia…

Liberia is located on the western coast of Africa.  It has a land area of 43,000 square miles.  Grassland and farms dominate Liberia’s landscape, and more than half of its people live in rural areas.  The climate is hot and humid with an average temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit.  Most of Liberia has a dry and a rainy season.  In the coastal areas the dry season lasts from December to March, but inland it can go much longer.  The coast receives about 200 inches of rain annually; inland areas receive only about 85 inches.  At one time Liberia was home to a great deal of wildlife, but overhunting has taken its toll.  Today, small populations of elephants, crocodiles, pygmy hippopotamuses, antelope, and leopards can still be found in the east and northwest part of the nation.

Interestingly, Liberia became a free nation more than 110 years before any other country in Africa, making it the oldest African republic.  Liberia is also the second-oldest country in the world with mainly black citizens – only Haiti is older.  Liberia was founded in 1822 by the American Colonization Society to provide a home for freed American slaves.  The society paid for their passage to the west coast of Africa.  In 1924, the colony was named “Liber,” which means free, and Monrovia was founded as its principal settlement.  Monrovia was named for the fifth president of the United States, James Monroe.

Today, roughly 25 percent of the population of Liberia is descendants of these freed American slaves, who are historically known as Americo-Liberians.  The remaining citizens are descendants of African tribesman who settled the area in the 1400s.  The Liberian government encourages the preservation of African culture, and many tribes still practice their tribal customs and speak their native languages.

Life in Liberia’s cities, however, is much like life in the United States.  Most of the Africo-Liberians have a distinctly American lifestyle.  And as the cities expand, many farmers and fishermen from the native tribes are abandoning their own ways for newer and more modern technology.