#MCC1214 – 1936-83 Germany Semipostals

Condition
Price
Qty
- Miscellaneous
Sold out.i
$1,200.00
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Issue Dates:            1936-1983

Scott Catalogue Value:      $1,582.20

Mystic Price:            $1,200.00

You Save:                  $382.20

 

Extensive Germany Semi-postal collection has approximately 550 stamps – about half in mounts – and 50 album pages.  The majority of the stamps are in mint condition with many also never-hinged.  This collection features many complete sets and some souvenir sheets.  Interesting items include a mint never-hinged #B102 and a postally unused #B104 sheet of four with First Day Cancel, both honoring Adolf Hitler’s 48th birthday.  Also features a #B72 (catalogue value $20) and #B105 (value $175), each in mint never-hinged condition.

     

After its defeat in World War II, Germany was divided by the victorious allied nations into four zones.  The French, English, and American zones became the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany).  The Russian zone in the East became a separate country, the German Democratic Republic (East Germany).

 

When the Federal Republic of Germany came into being in 1949, under the watchful eyes of the Western occupying forces, its cities still lay in ruins from the bombing raids of World War II.  Hard work, U.S. Marshall Plan aid, and favorable world economic conditions led to an amazingly rapid recovery.  Even 12 million refugees from the East, a problem at first, became an asset.  They swelled the ranks of workers, businessmen, and consumers.  The republic quickly became one of Europe’s healthiest democracies, and a leading industrial nation exporting to countries in all parts of the world.  Full independence was granted by the Allies in 1955.

 

The geography of Germany contributes a great deal to its strong economy.  A low, flat plain stretches across the northern part, and large river ports and many factories are located in this region.  To the south of this plain are beautiful central highlands, where the Rhine and other rivers have cut gorges and valleys into the hills.  Many beautiful and historic castles are nestled in the rock banks of the Rhine, as well as West Germany’s former capital of Bonn.  Between the snow-capped Bavarian Alps of southern Germany there are rich lowland farms.  To the southwest is the famous Black Forest – a dark, thick forest of fir and spruce trees that is the scene of many German fairy tales.

 

It is interesting that the English language developed from an ancient German dialect spoken by the Anglo-Saxons who settled England.  Many English words are much like German, such as the common greeting of “Good Morning” that has not changed greatly from the German “Guten Morgen.”

 

West Germany and East Germany were reunited as the Federal Republic of Germany on October 3, 1990.

 

 

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Issue Dates:            1936-1983

Scott Catalogue Value:      $1,582.20

Mystic Price:            $1,200.00

You Save:                  $382.20

 

Extensive Germany Semi-postal collection has approximately 550 stamps – about half in mounts – and 50 album pages.  The majority of the stamps are in mint condition with many also never-hinged.  This collection features many complete sets and some souvenir sheets.  Interesting items include a mint never-hinged #B102 and a postally unused #B104 sheet of four with First Day Cancel, both honoring Adolf Hitler’s 48th birthday.  Also features a #B72 (catalogue value $20) and #B105 (value $175), each in mint never-hinged condition.

     

After its defeat in World War II, Germany was divided by the victorious allied nations into four zones.  The French, English, and American zones became the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany).  The Russian zone in the East became a separate country, the German Democratic Republic (East Germany).

 

When the Federal Republic of Germany came into being in 1949, under the watchful eyes of the Western occupying forces, its cities still lay in ruins from the bombing raids of World War II.  Hard work, U.S. Marshall Plan aid, and favorable world economic conditions led to an amazingly rapid recovery.  Even 12 million refugees from the East, a problem at first, became an asset.  They swelled the ranks of workers, businessmen, and consumers.  The republic quickly became one of Europe’s healthiest democracies, and a leading industrial nation exporting to countries in all parts of the world.  Full independence was granted by the Allies in 1955.

 

The geography of Germany contributes a great deal to its strong economy.  A low, flat plain stretches across the northern part, and large river ports and many factories are located in this region.  To the south of this plain are beautiful central highlands, where the Rhine and other rivers have cut gorges and valleys into the hills.  Many beautiful and historic castles are nestled in the rock banks of the Rhine, as well as West Germany’s former capital of Bonn.  Between the snow-capped Bavarian Alps of southern Germany there are rich lowland farms.  To the southwest is the famous Black Forest – a dark, thick forest of fir and spruce trees that is the scene of many German fairy tales.

 

It is interesting that the English language developed from an ancient German dialect spoken by the Anglo-Saxons who settled England.  Many English words are much like German, such as the common greeting of “Good Morning” that has not changed greatly from the German “Guten Morgen.”

 

West Germany and East Germany were reunited as the Federal Republic of Germany on October 3, 1990.