#MCC1313 – 1852-96 Netherlands

Condition
Price
Qty
- Miscellaneous
Ships in 1 business day. i$1,595.00
$1,595.00

Issue Dates:            1852-1896

Scott Catalogue Value:      $2,112.10

Mystic Price:            $1,595.00

You Save:                  $517.10

 

Early Netherlands collection with many high-value stamps.  Contains a total of 74 stamps, most in postally used condition, and three album pages.  The collection begins with #1 and #1a, the 1852 5-cent blue and light blue issues valued at $72.50.  Other highlights include #3, #5-11 and a mint #18.  The combined catalogue value of these stamps alone is over $600.  Also features #22-33, the complete 1872-88 set (value $105).     

 

Although the Kingdom of the Netherlands is most commonly known as Holland, natives prefer to be called either Netherlanders or Dutchmen.  The Netherlands, which enjoys the oldest unbroken diplomatic relations with the United States in our history, is located on the North Sea, just above Belgium and France.  About the size of Massachusetts and Connecticut combined, most of the Netherlands is flat ground that lies below sea level.  The low, flat terrain makes the Netherlands great for farming.  Dutch farmers export their cheeses and flowers all over the world.

 

Since most land is below sea level, many of the Netherlands lakes and rivers have been drained for housing and farming.  The Netherlanders have also built many dikes to hold water back from low-lying land.  Because they have had to do so much to get enough usable land, the Dutch have a saying, God made the Earth, but the Dutch made Holland.

 

Most Dutchmen speak Dutch, which is a Germanic language.  But like most Europeans, they can also speak other languages such as English and French.  The Dutch are active people.  They like music, drama, and art.  Popular sports activities include sailing and ice skating.  Every Dutch roadway has wide bicycle lanes, perfect for bicycling and walking.  The average family has at least four bicycles.  In spring and summer, the days are so long that well after ten oclock in the evening, travelers see no sunset.  The vast expanse of flat land stretches out in all directions, and the only thing that stands out on the horizon is the occasional windmill.  Windmills used to pump water out of the land, but now they are simply part of the scenery, because today water is pumped by modern electrical power stations.

 

Although bicycling is a popular way to travel, Netherlanders also have one of the best public transit systems in the world.  The system, which includes buses, streetcars and trains, makes it easy to travel around the Netherlands, as well as other countries.  For example, a train bound for France leaves the station in Amsterdam every ten minutes.     

 

Visitors can take any one of the canal boat tours in the Netherlands three main cities of Amsterdam, Rotterdam, and the Hague.  On the tour, they get a glimpse of the unique homes that line the city waterways.  One also passes by many canal boats that some Netherlanders live on year round, even in the city.

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  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

Issue Dates:            1852-1896

Scott Catalogue Value:      $2,112.10

Mystic Price:            $1,595.00

You Save:                  $517.10

 

Early Netherlands collection with many high-value stamps.  Contains a total of 74 stamps, most in postally used condition, and three album pages.  The collection begins with #1 and #1a, the 1852 5-cent blue and light blue issues valued at $72.50.  Other highlights include #3, #5-11 and a mint #18.  The combined catalogue value of these stamps alone is over $600.  Also features #22-33, the complete 1872-88 set (value $105).     

 

Although the Kingdom of the Netherlands is most commonly known as Holland, natives prefer to be called either Netherlanders or Dutchmen.  The Netherlands, which enjoys the oldest unbroken diplomatic relations with the United States in our history, is located on the North Sea, just above Belgium and France.  About the size of Massachusetts and Connecticut combined, most of the Netherlands is flat ground that lies below sea level.  The low, flat terrain makes the Netherlands great for farming.  Dutch farmers export their cheeses and flowers all over the world.

 

Since most land is below sea level, many of the Netherlands lakes and rivers have been drained for housing and farming.  The Netherlanders have also built many dikes to hold water back from low-lying land.  Because they have had to do so much to get enough usable land, the Dutch have a saying, God made the Earth, but the Dutch made Holland.

 

Most Dutchmen speak Dutch, which is a Germanic language.  But like most Europeans, they can also speak other languages such as English and French.  The Dutch are active people.  They like music, drama, and art.  Popular sports activities include sailing and ice skating.  Every Dutch roadway has wide bicycle lanes, perfect for bicycling and walking.  The average family has at least four bicycles.  In spring and summer, the days are so long that well after ten oclock in the evening, travelers see no sunset.  The vast expanse of flat land stretches out in all directions, and the only thing that stands out on the horizon is the occasional windmill.  Windmills used to pump water out of the land, but now they are simply part of the scenery, because today water is pumped by modern electrical power stations.

 

Although bicycling is a popular way to travel, Netherlanders also have one of the best public transit systems in the world.  The system, which includes buses, streetcars and trains, makes it easy to travel around the Netherlands, as well as other countries.  For example, a train bound for France leaves the station in Amsterdam every ten minutes.     

 

Visitors can take any one of the canal boat tours in the Netherlands three main cities of Amsterdam, Rotterdam, and the Hague.  On the tour, they get a glimpse of the unique homes that line the city waterways.  One also passes by many canal boats that some Netherlanders live on year round, even in the city.