#MCC891 – 1940-90 Poland

Condition
Price
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- Miscellaneous
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$700.00

Issue Dates:            1940-1990

Scott Catalogue Value:      $1,273.95

Mystic Price:            $700.00

You Save:                  $573.95

 

Act now to get an extra-large Poland collection with 2,414 stamps and approximately 150 Scott album pages.  Most of the stamps are in mint condition with many also never-hinged.  About half are in mounts, making this an especially nice addition to your collection.

 

Highlights include Regular Issues #341-43, the 1944 Polish Peoples Republic issues valued at $122.50.  Also #830, the 1958 Souvenir Sheet printed on silk to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the Polish posts.  Plus many topical sets.

 

Poland has a long and varied history.  At one time, Poland ruled an empire that stretched across much of central Europe.  In 1795, Poland was conquered and divided among Russia, Germany, and Austria.  This brought an end to Polands centuries-old existence as a separate nation.  The Poles fought with Austria against the Russians in World War I.  In 1917, a Polish National Committee was formed in Paris to win allied support for an independent Poland.  Under the 1919 Treaty in Versailles, Poland regained large amounts of land from Germany.  In 1921, the Russian Treaty of Riga established a border that gave back some of the Russian territory.  The new Polish state faced many problems, but during the 1920s and 1930s, Poland slowly rebuilt its economy and developed uniform systems of government, transportation, and education.

 

In 1941, Germany seized all of Poland and a Polish government in exile was formed in London.  However, by 1948, Communist rule was firmly established.  In 1980, thousands of workers went on strike demanding political reforms.  Solidarity, an organization of free trade unions, was formed by Lech Walesa.  In 1989, the first non-Communist prime minister was appointed, and Communist control began to end.  The following year, Solidarity leader Lech Walesa was elected president of Poland.  Although Poland still had many problems to solve, once more it was a free and independent country.

 

Before World War II, Poland was largely agricultural and nearly three fourths of its people lived in rural areas.  Today, it has developed into a major industrial nation, and 63% of the people live in urban areas.  City families live in two- or three-room apartments, while small brick or wooden cottages provide housing in rural areas.  Many old traditions have disappeared, but some remain.  Religion and family still have a strong influence on Polish life.

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Issue Dates:            1940-1990

Scott Catalogue Value:      $1,273.95

Mystic Price:            $700.00

You Save:                  $573.95

 

Act now to get an extra-large Poland collection with 2,414 stamps and approximately 150 Scott album pages.  Most of the stamps are in mint condition with many also never-hinged.  About half are in mounts, making this an especially nice addition to your collection.

 

Highlights include Regular Issues #341-43, the 1944 Polish Peoples Republic issues valued at $122.50.  Also #830, the 1958 Souvenir Sheet printed on silk to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the Polish posts.  Plus many topical sets.

 

Poland has a long and varied history.  At one time, Poland ruled an empire that stretched across much of central Europe.  In 1795, Poland was conquered and divided among Russia, Germany, and Austria.  This brought an end to Polands centuries-old existence as a separate nation.  The Poles fought with Austria against the Russians in World War I.  In 1917, a Polish National Committee was formed in Paris to win allied support for an independent Poland.  Under the 1919 Treaty in Versailles, Poland regained large amounts of land from Germany.  In 1921, the Russian Treaty of Riga established a border that gave back some of the Russian territory.  The new Polish state faced many problems, but during the 1920s and 1930s, Poland slowly rebuilt its economy and developed uniform systems of government, transportation, and education.

 

In 1941, Germany seized all of Poland and a Polish government in exile was formed in London.  However, by 1948, Communist rule was firmly established.  In 1980, thousands of workers went on strike demanding political reforms.  Solidarity, an organization of free trade unions, was formed by Lech Walesa.  In 1989, the first non-Communist prime minister was appointed, and Communist control began to end.  The following year, Solidarity leader Lech Walesa was elected president of Poland.  Although Poland still had many problems to solve, once more it was a free and independent country.

 

Before World War II, Poland was largely agricultural and nearly three fourths of its people lived in rural areas.  Today, it has developed into a major industrial nation, and 63% of the people live in urban areas.  City families live in two- or three-room apartments, while small brick or wooden cottages provide housing in rural areas.  Many old traditions have disappeared, but some remain.  Religion and family still have a strong influence on Polish life.