Author Archives: MysticStamp

This Day in History… April 17, 1524

Verrazzano Explores New York Harbor 

U.S. #1258 – This stamp was issued on the day the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge opened.

On April 17, 1524, Giovanni da Verrazzano became the first European to see New York harbor.

Giovanni da Verrazzano was born in Val di Freve, near Florence, Italy around 1485. He had an interest in the sea and exploration from an early age. His first expeditions were to Egypt and Syria, locations that many had long thought were nearly impossible to reach.

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Posted in April 2016, This Day in History | 10 Comments

This Day in History… April 15, 1817

America’s Oldest School for the Deaf 

U.S. #1861 – Gallaudet served as the school’s first principal until 1830.

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet and Laurent Clerc founded the first permanent school for the deaf in America on April 15, 1817.

The first school for the deaf in America opened in 1815. It was opened by William Bolling in Cobbs, Virginia, with John Braidwood serving as the teacher. The school was short-lived, however, closing in the fall of 1816. It was Thomas Gallaudet who would go on to found the first permanent school for the deaf.

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Posted in April 2016, This Day in History | 6 Comments

This Day in History… April 15, 1865

Death of President Lincoln 

U.S. #77 – The first U.S. mourning stamp was issued a year after Lincoln’s death.

On April 15, 1865, President Lincoln died less than 12 hours after being shot by John Wilkes Booth.

By early April 1865, the Civil War was drawing to a close. The Union Army had taken the Confederate Capitol at Richmond and Robert E. Lee had surrendered his troops at Appomattox Court House in Virginia.

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This Day in History… April 14, 1912

The Titanic Sinks 

U.S. #3191l honors the 1997 James Cameron movie about the Titanic.

One of the most well known maritime disasters in history occurred on April 14, 1912, when the Titanic hit an iceberg and sank.

Construction on the RMS Titanic began on March 31, 1909, and was funded by J.P. Morgan and the International Mercantile Marine Company. The Titanic, along with the White Star ships Olympic and Britannic, were designed to be the largest and most luxurious ships of the time.

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Posted in April 2016, This Day in History | 10 Comments

This Day in History… April 13, 1743

Happy Birthday Thomas Jefferson 

U.S. #28 is from the first series of perforated U.S. postage stamps.

Thomas Jefferson was born on April 13, 1743, in Shadwell, Colony of Virginia.

Jefferson was the third of ten children in a prosperous family, permitting him to receive private tutoring at the age of five. He was an excellent student and gifted violinist who enjoyed dancing and horseback riding. Jefferson went on to graduate from the College of William & Mary with highest honors and began to study law. Jefferson was admitted to the Virginia bar in 1767.

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This Day in History… April 12, 1861

Battle of Fort Sumter Begins Civil War

U.S. #1178 was issued on the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Sumter.

On April 12, 1861, the North and South fought the first battle of the Civil War at Fort Sumter.

The day after Christmas, rowboats sliced quietly across Charleston Harbor under cover of darkness. South Carolina had seceded six days earlier, leaving Union Major General Robert Anderson and his group of 127 men stranded at Fort Moultrie, deep within rebel territory. Anderson and his troops left Fort Moultrie, which was impossible to defend, for the daring journey to nearby Fort Sumter, which was one of the strongest garrisons in the world at the time. As the sun rose, Anderson’s men proudly hoisted the Stars and Stripes over Fort Sumter, where it waved above the entrance to South Carolina’s most important port city.

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Posted in April 2016, This Day in History | 16 Comments