General Stamp Collecting

Hindenburg Disaster

Graf Zeppelin stamps are among the most sought-after of all U.S. stamps.  Sadly, the golden days of dirigibles ended with the Hindenburg disaster.  This short film clip captures that tragic event.

Dirigibles like the Hindenburg are pictured on the legendary Graf Zeppelin stamps.  You’ll find more about them here.

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1934 National Parks Issue

U.S. #740-49

U.S. #740-49

As a stamp collector, President Franklin D. Roosevelt personally oversaw the selection of stamp subjects and designs during his administration. As Roosevelt was reviewing suggestions for the 1934 schedule, Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes saw an opportunity to advertise the national park system. Ickes felt many Americans were unaware the federal government had set aside vast amounts of land for their enjoyment and for future generations. At his suggestion, 1934 had been declared National Parks Year. Ickes now proposed the legacy of the national parks be portrayed on postage stamps to give people a glimpse of their diversity and natural beauty. FDR approved the idea immediately, and ten parks were chosen, each to be pictured on a different denomination ranging from 1¢ to 10¢. Continue reading

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1929 Edison Commemoratives

These stamps were issued to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first incandescent electric light, invented by Thomas Edison.  Because of the Post Office policy never to portray a living person on a United States stamp, Edison’s picture could not be shown on the stamps that honored him.

U.S. #654 Flat Plate Printing

U.S. #654
Flat Plate Printing

US #655 Rotary Press Printing

US #655
Rotary Press Printing

US #656 Rotary Press Coil

US #656
Rotary Press Coil

U.S. #656 was the third stamp issued with this design, produced for use in vending machines. This was the first time a commemorative stamp was issued in coil format.

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1925 Norse-American Issue

U.S. #620-21 Restaurationen & Viking Ship

U.S. #620-21
Restaurationen & Viking Ship

The Norse-American issue honors two important events in the history of Norwegian Americans – the arrival of Leif Ericson and the first Norwegian immigrants in America.

The Norse-American Stamps
These were among the handful of stamps produced since the 1901 Pan-Americans to feature bi-color printing, a costly and time-consuming process. Because the stamps took so long to print, they were produced in much smaller quantities than other stamps of the day.   Producing large quantities of the stamps was difficult too, because they were printed in sheets of 100, rather than 400, like most stamps at that time.
When the stamps were released, they were in great demand, with post offices around the country receiving several calls for them daily. A second printing was suggested, but was far too costly. It has been estimated that less than 300 post offices received the stamps, with some only getting one or two sheets each, making them even more difficult to find today.
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1925 Lexington-Concord Issue

The Lexington-Concord Issue of 1925 was the first set of U.S. postage stamps to honor the War of Independence. These stamps honor the patriots who gave their lives – and the ideals of freedom and independence they died for.

U.S. #617 Washington at Cambridge

U.S. #617
Washington at Cambridge

U.S. #618 Birth of Liberty

U.S. #618
Birth of Liberty

U.S. #619 The Minute Man

U.S. #619
The Minute Man

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1924 Huguenot-Walloon Issue

This series of stamps commemorates the role of Protestant immigrants in settling America in honor of the 300th anniversary of the first successful colony. The Huguenots were French Protestants who, in the 16th century, established the first Presbyterian Church in France. After having their rights stripped by French King Louis XIV and Cardinal Richilieu, the Huguenots fled to other countries – and eventually, America. The first settlements were as early as 1562 and 1564, but they soon failed.  The Walloons were Dutch Protestants who suffered similar oppression. A 1624 expedition funded by the Dutch West India Company was much more successful, establishing a settlement at Fort Orange (now present-day Albany, New York).
Dispatched by the Dutch West India Company, about 30 Walloon families sailed from Amsterdam to colonize the New World. This issue pictures their ship the Nieu Nederland.

Dispatched by the Dutch West India Company, about 30 Walloon families sailed from Amsterdam to colonize the New World. This issue pictures their ship the Nieu Nederland.

The Walloons settled along the Hudson River, and U.S. #615 shows the landing at Fort Orange (Albany). The stamp marks the 300th anniversary of Walloon immigration, but also salutes the Huguenots who followed the Walloons in settling New England.

The Walloons settled along the Hudson River, and U.S. #615 shows the landing at Fort Orange (Albany). The stamp marks the 300th anniversary of Walloon immigration, but also salutes the Huguenots who followed the Walloons in settling New England.

The monument on this stamp is located in Mayport, Florida, and marks another area where the Huguenots settled. The monument on U.S. #616 is called the “Jean Ribaut Monument.” Ribaut had helped organize early Huguenot settlements, but the colony settled in 1564 near Mayport, Florida, was too close to Spanish shipping lanes. The settlers were wiped out by the Spanish in 1565.

The monument on this stamp is located in Mayport, Florida, and marks another area where the Huguenots settled. The monument on U.S. #616 is called the “Jean Ribaut Monument.” Ribaut had helped organize early Huguenot settlements, but the colony settled in 1564 near Mayport, Florida, was too close to Spanish shipping lanes. The settlers were wiped out by the Spanish in 1565.

 

 

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