January 2016

This Day in History… January 13, 1929

Death of Wyatt Earp

U.S. #2869j – Earp has been called the “toughest and deadliest gunman of his day.”

After a life of wandering the frontier as a lawman, businessman, and gambler, Wyatt Earp died on January 13, 1929.

The third of five sons, Wyatt Earp was born on March 19, 1848 in Monmouth, Illinois.  His father was often restless and frequently moved his family throughout the unsettled American West, hoping to strike it rich.  Wyatt had this same restless spirit that led him to wander the frontier for most of his life.
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This Day in History… January 12, 1876

Birth of Jack London

U.S. #2182 – London wrote 51 books during his life, though several weren’t released until after his death.

Acclaimed writer Jack London was born on January 12, 1876, in San Francisco, California.

Born John Griffith Chaney, the future author adopted the name “Jack” at an early age.  And he took the surname London from his step-father John London, a Civil War veteran.

The young London credited his rise to literary success to his reading of the Victorian novel Signa in 1885.  He spent many of his childhood hours in the Oakland Public Library with librarian and future poet laureate, Ina Coolbrith.
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This Day in History… January 11, 1755

U.S. #154 – Hamilton helped found the New York Post in 1801.

Birth of Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton was born on January 11, 1755 (or 57 – the year is unknown), in Nevis in the British West Indies.

Hamilton began working as a clerk in an accounting office when he was about 11 years old.  When his employer realized how bright Hamilton was, he sent him to America for an education.  In 1773, Hamilton arrived in New York and attended King’s College.  His focus soon turned from education to politics.  The following year, he wrote his first article in defense of the patriots’ protests of British taxes.
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This Day in History… January 10, 1917

Farewell to “Buffalo Bill”

U.S. #2177 – Historians doubt some of Cody’s stories from his early life, believing they were made up for publicity.

U.S. #2177 – Historians doubt some of Cody’s stories from his early life, believing they were made up for publicity.

On January 10, 1917, famed scout and showman “Buffalo” Bill Cody died.

William Frederick “Buffalo Bill” Cody, was born on February 26, 1846, in LeClaire, Iowa.  Following his father’s death, Cody took his first job as a driver on west-bound wagon trains at age eleven.  In that role, he rode on horseback alongside trains delivering messages between drivers and workmen.  Cody became an accomplished horse wrangler, hunter, and “Indian fighter” by his teens.
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This Day in History… January 9, 1788

U.S. #772 – Click the image to read the neat story behind Connecticut’s famed “Charter Oak.”

Connecticut Becomes 5th State

On January 9, 1788, Connecticut ratified the U.S. Constitution, making it the fifth state to join the young United States.

English colonists from Massachusetts founded Connecticut’s first permanent European settlement, Windsor, in 1633.  Most of these settlers left Massachusetts seeking political and religious freedom.  Other settlements quickly followed, including Hartford, New London, Saybrook, and Wethersfield.  In 1636, Hartford, Wethersfield, and Windsor united to form the Connecticut Colony, also known as the River Colony.
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This Day in History… January 8, 1815

U.S. #1261 pictures both Jackson leading his men and the Battle of New Orleans Sesquicentennial medal.

The Battle of New Orleans Begins

On January 8, 1815, future president Andrew Jackson began the Battle of New Orleans, two weeks after the Treaty of Ghent was signed.

After more than two years of fighting, American and British diplomats met in Belgium in December 1814 to talk peace and end the War of 1812.  At the same time, British troops in America prepared a three-pronged invasion they hoped would also bring an end to the war.  After their first two attempts at Baltimore and Plattsburg failed, the British set their sights on New Orleans, a strategically important seaport that served as a gateway to the west.
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Posted in January 2016, This Day in History | 14 Comments